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Any word on when the new plans will be announced?

 

FSG had to commit to at least 60,000 stadium as a condition of buying the club. It's been nearly 10 years.

 

That's b******s isn't it?

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From James Pearce in the Athletic:

 

It’s a scene that is replicated outside Anfield on every match day.

 

An hour before Saturday’s game with Leicester City, there were Liverpool fans from across the world still desperately trying to lay their hands on match tickets.

 

Dozens had patiently queued up at the ticket office behind the Kop only to be informed that there had been no returns. It was another 54,000 sell-out.

 

One devastated German fan with his young son explained how he had been let down at the last minute by a tout, who had promised to sell him a pair online, only to receive a text saying they were no longer available. He had got a more lucrative offer from elsewhere.

 

The most expensive general admission ticket at Anfield costs £59 but even for run-of-the-mill fixtures they regularly change hands for three or four times that amount. During last season’s title run-in they were being sold on the black market for thousands.

 

Each match day there are sad tales of supporters being left hundreds of pounds out of pocket after being informed at the turnstiles that the tickets they had bought outside were fake.

 

The club has enlisted the help of private investigators in their mission to fight back against the touts.

 

Earlier this year it emerged that about 650 fans’ accounts were being investigated for the unauthorised selling of match tickets. One individual was banned after police found him with some 500 members’ cards at a city centre hotel.

 

“There is no question that Liverpool Football Club is one of the biggest targets for touts,” admitted LFC’s chief operating officer Andy Hughes.

 

It all stems from the fact that the demand to watch the European champions and Premier League leaders far outstrips supply.

 

Liverpool have about 26,000 season ticket holders and a further 23,000 are on a season ticket waiting list which has been closed since 2011.

 

With season tickets usually passed down through the generations rather than handed back to the club, fans who joined that list back in 2001 had to wait until 17 years later to be given the opportunity to get one.

 

Tens of thousands of supporters from across the globe pay between £26.99 and £44.99 per year for annual membership for the chance to try to purchase tickets online but many are left disappointed.

 

No wonder Liverpool’s announcement back in August which “reaffirmed their intention to redevelop the Anfield Road Stand with ambitious new plans now under active consideration” was so widely welcomed by fans. For those stuck on the outside looking in, a bigger Anfield can’t come soon enough.

 

The new Main Stand, which opened in September 2016, is one of the finest achievements of Fenway Sports Group’s reign as owners.

 

The imposing £110 million structure added an extra 8,500 seats to lift capacity to 54,000. In truth it dragged Liverpool’s historic home into the 21st century and helped to regenerate the local area.

 

It’s been a huge success with match-day revenues increasing from £62 million to £81 million per season since it was completed. In less than a decade it will have paid for itself.

 

“I’m especially proud of the accomplishment we made in figuring out the Main Stand challenge,” chairman Tom Werner told The Athletic back in July. “There were some dark days early on. We not only had to come up with a scheme that made sense but Liverpool City Council had to convince home owners to sell so we in turn could buy the land from the council. Without 100 per cent participation, we couldn’t have moved forward. The whole point of it was to improve fan experience. I’m proud of what we’ve done.”

 

However, despite the clamour to push on with the Anfield Road Stand, FSG has taken its time.

 

The focus in terms of the club’s infrastructure over the past two years has been on building a new £50 million state-of-the-art training complex for the first team at the Kirkby Academy. That’s on track to open its doors to Jurgen Klopp and his squad next summer.

 

Liverpool haven’t wanted to spread either their resources or their manpower too thinly, but behind the scenes extensive feasibility studies into how best to further increase Anfield’s capacity have been conducted.

 

It was no surprise that the September deadline for the outline planning permission Liverpool already had in place from 2014 to redevelop the Anfield Road Stand was allowed to elapse.

 

That scheme would only have allowed them to add about 4,000 extra seats. Liverpool have their sights set on a grander, more ambitious vision which would lift capacity past 60,000.

 

However, with a number of potential designs still under consideration, The Athletic understands that it will be 2020 before a fresh planning application is submitted to Liverpool City Council.

 

That would coincide with an extensive public consultation process. There are bound to be concerns raised about traffic and public transport pressures on match days and Liverpool are fully committed to working closely with local residents and planning officials to plot a way forward.

 

Liverpool City Region Mayor Steve Rotheram recently said he was “optimistic” that a new train station serving Anfield could be delivered and that would certainly help matters.

 

It promises to be a laborious process. Anfield officials won’t commit to timescales, but having it completed for the 2022-23 season is understood to be the best case scenario.

 

On the field, Klopp has rebuilt the fortress. Unbeaten at home in the Premier League for two-and-a-half years, the atmosphere inspires those in red and strikes fear into opponents.

 

But there are many hurdles left to clear before a bigger, better Anfield becomes a reality.

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I reckon they're going to build a big hotel round the back, where the H&G stadium was going to be. 

 

Based on nothing, am only guessing. But the space where they were supposed to build one hasn't materialised, and I don't think the space was big enough.

 

Wasn't there some numbers around about not being enough hotel rooms in Liverpool when we play at home. Add 6+ concerts or other events to all our home games. Presumably the demand is there to build a big hotel. Hospitality on match days as well. 

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There is absolutely no chance a new train station gets built. It's pie in the sky.

 

 

The route is used heavily for freight traffic and it would be a phenomenal achievement to open it up for public use that the city council has shown itself completely lacking in ability undertake previously. And even if they did somehow find the will it would take years.

 

A bus rapid transit system would make a lot more sense. Designated bus lane from Lime Street to Stanley Park.

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I reckon they're going to build a big hotel round the back, where the H&G stadium was going to be. 

 

Based on nothing, am only guessing. But the space where they were supposed to build one hasn't materialised, and I don't think the space was big enough.

 

Wasn't there some numbers around about not being enough hotel rooms in Liverpool when we play at home. Add 6+ concerts or other events to all our home games. Presumably the demand is there to build a big hotel. Hospitality on match days as well.

 

There isn't enough hotel rooms in the city generally never mind on match day.

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From James Pearce in the Athletic:

 

It’s a scene that is replicated outside Anfield on every match day.

 

An hour before Saturday’s game with Leicester City, there were Liverpool fans from across the world still desperately trying to lay their hands on match tickets.

 

Dozens had patiently queued up at the ticket office behind the Kop only to be informed that there had been no returns. It was another 54,000 sell-out.

 

One devastated German fan with his young son explained how he had been let down at the last minute by a tout, who had promised to sell him a pair online, only to receive a text saying they were no longer available. He had got a more lucrative offer from elsewhere.

 

The most expensive general admission ticket at Anfield costs £59 but even for run-of-the-mill fixtures they regularly change hands for three or four times that amount. During last season’s title run-in they were being sold on the black market for thousands.

 

Each match day there are sad tales of supporters being left hundreds of pounds out of pocket after being informed at the turnstiles that the tickets they had bought outside were fake.

 

The club has enlisted the help of private investigators in their mission to fight back against the touts.

 

Earlier this year it emerged that about 650 fans’ accounts were being investigated for the unauthorised selling of match tickets. One individual was banned after police found him with some 500 members’ cards at a city centre hotel.

 

“There is no question that Liverpool Football Club is one of the biggest targets for touts,” admitted LFC’s chief operating officer Andy Hughes.

 

It all stems from the fact that the demand to watch the European champions and Premier League leaders far outstrips supply.

 

Liverpool have about 26,000 season ticket holders and a further 23,000 are on a season ticket waiting list which has been closed since 2011.

 

With season tickets usually passed down through the generations rather than handed back to the club, fans who joined that list back in 2001 had to wait until 17 years later to be given the opportunity to get one.

 

Tens of thousands of supporters from across the globe pay between £26.99 and £44.99 per year for annual membership for the chance to try to purchase tickets online but many are left disappointed.

 

No wonder Liverpool’s announcement back in August which “reaffirmed their intention to redevelop the Anfield Road Stand with ambitious new plans now under active consideration” was so widely welcomed by fans. For those stuck on the outside looking in, a bigger Anfield can’t come soon enough.

 

The new Main Stand, which opened in September 2016, is one of the finest achievements of Fenway Sports Group’s reign as owners.

 

The imposing £110 million structure added an extra 8,500 seats to lift capacity to 54,000. In truth it dragged Liverpool’s historic home into the 21st century and helped to regenerate the local area.

 

It’s been a huge success with match-day revenues increasing from £62 million to £81 million per season since it was completed. In less than a decade it will have paid for itself.

 

“I’m especially proud of the accomplishment we made in figuring out the Main Stand challenge,” chairman Tom Werner told The Athletic back in July. “There were some dark days early on. We not only had to come up with a scheme that made sense but Liverpool City Council had to convince home owners to sell so we in turn could buy the land from the council. Without 100 per cent participation, we couldn’t have moved forward. The whole point of it was to improve fan experience. I’m proud of what we’ve done.”

 

However, despite the clamour to push on with the Anfield Road Stand, FSG has taken its time.

 

The focus in terms of the club’s infrastructure over the past two years has been on building a new £50 million state-of-the-art training complex for the first team at the Kirkby Academy. That’s on track to open its doors to Jurgen Klopp and his squad next summer.

 

Liverpool haven’t wanted to spread either their resources or their manpower too thinly, but behind the scenes extensive feasibility studies into how best to further increase Anfield’s capacity have been conducted.

 

It was no surprise that the September deadline for the outline planning permission Liverpool already had in place from 2014 to redevelop the Anfield Road Stand was allowed to elapse.

 

That scheme would only have allowed them to add about 4,000 extra seats. Liverpool have their sights set on a grander, more ambitious vision which would lift capacity past 60,000.

 

However, with a number of potential designs still under consideration, The Athletic understands that it will be 2020 before a fresh planning application is submitted to Liverpool City Council.

 

That would coincide with an extensive public consultation process. There are bound to be concerns raised about traffic and public transport pressures on match days and Liverpool are fully committed to working closely with local residents and planning officials to plot a way forward.

 

Liverpool City Region Mayor Steve Rotheram recently said he was “optimistic” that a new train station serving Anfield could be delivered and that would certainly help matters.

 

It promises to be a laborious process. Anfield officials won’t commit to timescales, but having it completed for the 2022-23 season is understood to be the best case scenario.

 

On the field, Klopp has rebuilt the fortress. Unbeaten at home in the Premier League for two-and-a-half years, the atmosphere inspires those in red and strikes fear into opponents.

 

But there are many hurdles left to clear before a bigger, better Anfield becomes a reality.

13 years after the committeed to a capacity of at least 60,000 is a joke.

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How long should it have taken out of curiosity? It really isn't as simple as do some drawings, by some steel, knock up a stand. 

 

 

Spurs did ok.

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The patch of land of WBR adjacent to the souvenir shop was earmarked for a Hilton wasn't it?

 

 

Already one planned at the other end of the ground I think.

 

Yeah it was and there was. Although a bit of digging suggests it might not have been too solid a plan. 

 

The client on the 'Hilton' images that did the rounds, are for an entity called the 'Xenia Hotel Group'. A bit of further investigation shows that to be a one woman operation, quite possibly a shell co, based in Knowsley business park. 

 

Not sure who owns the land there. The council maybe? Could have thrown a hotel up pretty quick if the appetite had been there. 

Edited by Six Times

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