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Hus

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Everything posted by Hus

  1. Hus

    Coronavirus

    I hope so - really worried about the real numbers from care homes and those who were not tested..
  2. Hus

    Coronavirus

    With all the talk from Hancock and co that we're at the peak - cant help but think they are trying to set the scene for easing restrictions in a few weeks.
  3. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Its from Foundmyfitness - Dr Rhonda Patrick. I am always a bit sceptical, but it does seem well researched.
  4. Hus

    Coronavirus

    As with a number of these articles, they appear well researched but there are always conflicting reports. The YouTube linked from the original email is: I scanned the comments, one that jumped out was one citing: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/covid-19/my-response-to-rhonda-patrick-on-vitamin-d-and-covid-19 Which contradicts some of the above. But both are promoting their own material which makes me sceptical.
  5. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Said Vitamin D article: Vitamin D status. An easily addressed (but often ignored) problem for many people. Today's email is to lay out why I think Vitamin D might be ultimately proven to be a crucial factor in reducing susceptibility to lung injury due to COVID-19. What mediates this effect? An enzyme called ACE2. If that enzyme sounds familiar, it's because ACE2 (short for angiotensin converting enzyme 2) plays a critical role in infection from SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19. The effect of vitamin D on susceptibility to COVID-19-associated lung injury. Let's back up a bit, though, and I'll fill you in on a little background on vitamin D. The first thing to know about vitamin D is that it is NOT just a vitamin. It's a steroid hormone. Underscoring its importance: it actually regulates more than 5% of the protein-encoding genome! Somewhat alarmingly, this is actually another way of saying that possibly as much as 70% of people, which is the percentage of people in the United States that have a vitamin D status that the Endocrine Society refers to insufficient, may be experiencing at least partial dysregulation in up to 5% of their protein-encoding genome! At the very least, it's almost certainly the case among the 30% that fully qualifies as vitamin D deficient are. You can obtain small quantities of vitamin D in food, but your primary source is a stepwise process that starts in your skin following exposure to ultraviolet light and continues in your liver and kidneys, where the vitamin's active form is made. Since ultraviolet light is required for vitamin D synthesis, reduced exposure to the sun or having dark-colored skin impairs vitamin D production. Older adults, whose skin isn't as efficient at producing vitamin D, and obese people, whose excess fat stores sequester the vitamin, are also more likely to be deficient. RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS A ton of evidence suggests that vitamin D is protective against respiratory tract infections. Data from 25 randomized controlled trials from around the world demonstrate that vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory infection by more than 50 percent, especially in people with low baseline vitamin D levels. Where does ACE2 fit in? SARS-CoV-2 virus enters human cells via the ACE2 receptor. Viral particles bind to the ACE2 receptor and together they travel into the cell. These viral particles can bind to a large number of ACE2 molecules, sequestering them from the cell surface and decreasing ACE2. This has been shown to happen with the virus that caused the original SARS outbreak, SARS-CoV-1, which also binds to the ACE2 receptor. The accompanying loss of ACE2 function can cause serious health consequences due to ACE2's participation in key physiological processes. Here's where vitamin D deficiency comes in... Vitamin D deficiency leads to overexpression of renin (an enzyme produced in the kidneys) and subsequent activation of the renin-angiotensin system, a critical regulator of blood pressure, inflammation, and body fluid homeostasis. Loss of ACE2 function in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection upsets the balance of this critical system, promoting neutrophil infiltration, excessive inflammation, and lung injury. If lung injury progresses to hypoxia, the kidneys release renin, setting up a vicious cycle for decreasing ACE2. In turn, lower levels of ACE2 promote more damage, culminating in acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS. a severe form of acute lung injury that occurs in as many as 17 percent of all COVID-19 cases and can lead to respiratory failure and death. But vitamin D acts as an endocrine repressor of the renin-angiotensin system by downregulating the expression of renin, the rate-limiting enzyme of the renin-angiotensin cascade, and rescuing lung function. A preclinical model of acute lung injury showed that administration of vitamin D provided protection against lung injury by increasing ACE2 levels and decreasing renin production. Here's the kicker: The acute lung injury led to a decrease in ACE2, driving even worse lung injury. Vitamin D supplementation increased ACE2 receptor levels, but only in conditions of acute lung injury where ACE2 levels decreased. When vitamin D was given to control animals, it didn't increase ACE2 levels. This means that vitamin D normalizes ACE2 levels in situations only where it is decreased. Many aspects of modern life are at odds with our natural production of vitamin D. We wear clothes. We wear sunscreen. We might work inside all day – or be under stay-at-home orders. Supplemental vitamin D might be a viable means to increase our vitamin D to sufficient levels and potentially reduce the risk of complications associated with COVID-19. Practical take-home? Let's talk about the tolerable upper intake of vitamin D. The Nutrition board of the Institute of Medicine conservatively set the tolerable upper intake of vitamin D at a level of around 4,000 IU/day including safe for pregnant and lactating women, which suggests that it is generally thought that, at that dose, toxicity is extremely unlikely.[1][2] This is good to know because while that dose is on the upper end by the standard of tolerable upper intake, it has been demonstrated across multiple studies to improve vitamin D blood status in otherwise deficient individuals.
  6. Hus

    Coronavirus

    300k - wow How do you feel now? I wouldn't say it's night and day for me, but I have definitely felt a difference even if it's subtle, energy levels and general well-being.
  7. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Yes, 1000iu seems to be the standard daily dose for most. My GP said there would be no issues with 2000iu, but I guess everyone is different. When my initial tests came back she had me on 8000iu for 5-6 weeks, I am also Asian so need a higher dose. I came across a interesting article earlier today re Vitamin D, that also mentions that higher doses are okay. I'll share. Sorry to hear that chap
  8. Hus

    Coronavirus

    These incompetent c**** are all about headlines and buzz words, absolutely no regards for anything other than the economy and self preservation. Re Vitamin D, I have been taking 2000iu for months (blood test had my levels as extremely deficient). You can take upto 4000iu a day for a couple of weeks for a initial boost and then revert back to 1000-2000iu a day. There are loads available but I was recommended a brand called Viridian by a GP friend of mine.
  9. Hus

    Looking after ourselves

    They also have a poisonous bird!
  10. Hus

    Coronavirus

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/opendemocracyuk/exclusive-nhs-using-flawed-covid-19-test-missing-25-of-positives/ Boris and co lining up their scapegoat - he's incompetent but they are all to blame for this situation. WTF NHS laboratories are using a flawed test for coronavirus, according to a leaked Public Health England document seen by openDemocracy. Experts warn that the test fails to detect up to 25% of positive COVID-19 results. Although the current test is known to be inconsistent, NHS labs are nonetheless being advised to continue using it, while an urgent “migration” or shift to a commercially available test takes place. The leaked document from the National Infection Service (NIS) will put intense pressure on Health Secretary Matt Hancock to explain why the NHS has been using knowingly flawed tests for many weeks, as national death rates have spiralled. Hancock – who promised 100,000 tests a week by the end of April – recently said that “no test is better than a bad test”. Yet the documents reveal that senior government advisers have known for some weeks that the UK’s critical coronavirus test was not entirely reliable. Among the leading scientists who have seen the NIS document, the reaction has been one of outrage. One said: “There should be mass resignations, both at the top of PHE and in the government. We should expect better.” Jon Ashworth, Labour's Shadow Health Secretary, said: “Ministers boasted we were world leading in developing this test back in January. If there have been concerns about its accuracy, senior figures have a duty to be clear and transparent with the public. Given the Secretary of State has promised 100,000 tests a day by the end of the month we now need total clarity on what these tests are and who will be processing them." Throughout the pandemic, the government has regularly stated that at “all times” medical and scientific advice has been followed, and that the “right thing has been done at the right time.” A testing ‘catastrophe’ Despite two months of reviewing the key test used in the UK to detect the virus – officially known as the ‘PHE SARS-CoV-2RdRp assay’ – no minister, leading scientific or medical adviser has publicly acknowledged that the test is not fully reliable. Although a numerical evaluation of the test’s reliability is not included in the NIS document, openDemocracy has learned from a leading pathologist with knowledge of the NIS’s ongoing review that the test misses 25 percent of positive cases. That, according to one leading epidemiologist, is a “catastrophe”. It means that those given a virus-free status in error since testing first began two months ago would not have known they were infected. As such, they would have continued spreading the disease among their close family and – if they continued going to work or not practising social distancing – among the wider community. They would have continued spreading the disease The UK is currently projected to have one of the worst infection and death rates of any country in Europe. The NIS document seen by openDemocracy is authorised by Dr Susan Hopkins, Professor Maria Zambon and Professor Andrew Mumford: all senior research directors who report to the chief executive of Public Health England, Duncan Selbie, and ultimately to Matt Hancock as Health Secretary. UK ‘bottom of the queue’ for reliable tests Evidence of “quality assurance difficulties” for key reagents – essentially the test’s chemical makeup – is quoted in the document as one of the contributing factors for the test’s unreliable performance. The document says that Public Health England (PHE) has reviewed its own COVID-19 test and has agreed “immediate actions” to mitigate or rectify the problems. Among the advice given to laboratories using the PHE test is to be careful before “calling” a result negative, to "retest ambiguous samples", and to move towards using commercial tests. Private-sector tests are sold by major pharmaceutical firms such as Hoffmann-La Roche, Abbott Laboratories and others. Commercial laboratories and academic institutions, such as the Crick Institute in London, largely use commercially available tests and not the PHE test. However due to the worldwide demand for COVID-19 testing, these commercially available tests are now in short supply. If all NHS labs were to suddenly be mandated to switch to commercial products, one leading professor said: “We would find ourselves simply at the bottom of a very large queue for these critical materials.” The three advisers who authorised the document make it clear that use of the flawed PHE test cannot continue. But, given the lack of an immediate alternative, they advise NHS labs in the meantime to take care in interpreting the results. A “shortage of swabs” and the specialist fluid used to “transport” the swabs to laboratories are also identified in the documents as causing variations in the performance of the Public Health England SARS test in NHS laboratories. The importance of accuracy in test results was emphasised late last month by Professor Chris Whitty, the government’s chief medical officer. At a time when questions about the reliability of the PHE test would have been surfacing internally, Professor Whitty discussed the use of tests that might detect the presence of antibodies in those who had recovered from the virus. He said tests needed to be “incredibly accurate,” adding: “If they are not accurate, we will not release any of them.” Last month Health Secretary Matt Hancock authorised the purchase of £20m antibody tests from China. The tests were later found to be unreliable and effectively junked. It is understood the Chinese tests were 60 percent reliable.
  11. Hus

    Coronavirus

    That seemed to be the gist of what they were talking about last night, they were interviewing someone who had recovered, she had been told by her GP and was questioning why it wasn't widely known.
  12. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Heard a couple of bits on the radio just now that I hadn't heard before. Apparently though the initial infection is viral the secondary infection can actually be bacterial and therefore antibiotics can help, therefore shouldn't rule out going to your GP who might be able to help any secondary infection before it gets worse. Also, a more worrying aspect, apparently the virus is effecting the kidneys, with bad cases requiring people to go on temporary dialysis to allow the kidneys to recover.
  13. Hus

    Gaming

    Tried Kahoot the other night - was a good laugh, we ran it via a zoom session which worked well.
  14. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Ibby, so sorry to hear that, hopefully she'll pull through, I expect my words will mean little to your uncle, but this virus is so inconsistent, not only that but there have been so many other bugs going around, I know it's turned out differently but she might not have had it and been exposed to it at the hospital. Thoughts and prayers with you and yours.
  15. Hus

    Coronavirus

    So sorry Sammy, my thoughts and prayers are with you and yours.
  16. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Clueless f***wits the lot of them.
  17. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Ah yes, agree a couple were absolutely useless, but some were definitely better, granted the bar isn't very high.
  18. Hus

    Gaming

    Great, I'll sign up and then we can battle to be 7th and 8th My nephews love Fortnite, I tried once or twice, I'm just so crap at FPS games!
  19. Hus

    Coronavirus

    Good to hear the journalists have finally started being firmer and more direct with their questions.
  20. Hus

    Gaming

    Been meaning to get back online, is Apex battle royale style? @Dan did you get a online Nintendo pass? Is it any good?
  21. Hus

    TV shows (but not GoT)

    Yes! Such a great movie
  22. Hus

    Coronavirus

    That sounds familiar, I had completely forgotten about it being a two stage thing
  23. Hus

    Coronavirus

    I had my BCG at school when I was around 13 iirc. If it is beneficial, our numbers would be lower? It's no longer given by default, not sure how the UK approach compares with other locations.
  24. Hus

    Coronavirus

    This is interesting https://www.forbes.com/sites/ericmack/2020/03/31/a-vaccine-from-the-1920s-could-help-fight-the-coronavirus-pandemic/
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