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Taking up Golf


Gooner Spy

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Not sure if there are many golfers around here, but just in case, I thought I might solicit some advice. I have been thinking about taking it up for a while, and would like to go ahead with it and take the plunge. Can anyone provide some pointers on the following:

  • Should I buy some clubs before I start so I can get used to the, rather than using different rental clubs each time?
  • Obviously lessons would be the starting point, but approx how many would a beginner need till he can think about playing a course?
  • How much should you look to pay for a basic starter set of clubs? Where is the best place to look for these?
  • Is it worth the expense and hassle? I can be quite short fused so I have a lingering doubt that I would have the right temprament for it!!

Any hints, tips etc gratefully received!

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[*]Should I buy some clubs before I start so I can get used to the, rather than using different rental clubs each time?
[*]How much should you look to pay for a basic starter set of clubs? Where is the best place to look for these?

 

It depends how serious you are. A decent set, let alone a good one, will probably set you back at least £100 online. I got a set from a charity shop for £30 which i used a few times before buying a new set for £150 from a local specialised store.

 

[*]Obviously lessons would be the starting point, but approx how many would a beginner need till he can think about playing a course?

 

I haven't had one professional lesson and have no trouble, but I would recommend you do get some lessons. I was lucky enough to play with a friend who is pretty good so he gave me pointers. I also started on a less strict course, which meant i could happily plod around finding my feet for a few months before moving on.

 

[*]Is it worth the expense and hassle? I can be quite short fused so I have a lingering doubt that I would have the right temprament for it!!

totally, i'm the same as you, I am incredbily short-tempered but I love it. When you first start it is the most frustrating thing in the world, but that first time you make a quality shot the feeling is brilliant.

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Buy yourself a half set to start with (3, 5, 7, 9 irons, wedge, 3 wood and puttter) and get down the driving range and the local pitch and putt courses to get comfortable with your swing, addressing the ball etc.

 

I've never had a lesson in my life and can play well enough to enjoy the game - my handicap would be about 18, though I only play about once a week in the summer and will shoot high 70s/low 80s when I'm back in the groove, so lessons certainly aren't essentiel.

 

Website called Sports HQ do decent deals on clubs and other gear as well.

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It depends how serious you are. A decent set, let alone a good one, will probably set you back at least £100 online. I got a set from a charity shop for £30 which i used a few times before buying a new set for £150 from a local specialised store.

 

I saw a couple of sets on ebay and at the American Golf store at around the 150 mark, TBH I was expecting to pay a s*** load more. Would something at that range be any good for a starter set? Any reccomendations?

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I saw a couple of sets on ebay and at the American Golf store at around the 150 mark, TBH I was expecting to pay a s*** load more. Would something at that range be any good for a starter set? Any reccomendations?

 

Avoid American Golf if you can - they tend to be a complete rip off. The only shop i know to drop the word discount out of their name.

 

I would buy a second hand set first. Go down to your local club/municipal and have a word with the pro there and he should let you try them out (if they sell second hand sets). My first ever set was a second hand set of Ping's - cost about £200 and were superb.

 

I've never had lessons but i've hit a wall with how far i can go and now want to step up a bit so am going to have a few.

 

I'm quite impatient and have had a short temper in the past with golf, but I love the game.

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Avoid American Golf if you can - they tend to be a complete rip off. The only shop i know to drop the word discount out of their name.

 

I would buy a second hand set first. Go down to your local club/municipal and have a word with the pro there and he should let you try them out (if they sell second hand sets). My first ever set was a second hand set of Ping's - cost about £200 and were superb.

 

I've never had lessons but i've hit a wall with how far i can go and now want to step up a bit so am going to have a few.

 

I'm quite impatient and have had a short temper in the past with golf, but I love the game.

 

How do these look?

 

http://www.thesportshq.com/ProductDetails.asp?PCLinkID=2256

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They look fine although you won't be using the hybrid irons for a while as they are more difficult to use.

 

The cheaper the better though because if you don't like it you'll be gutted if you've forked out loads.

 

Do any of your mates play golf who can go down the driving range with you and help you out at first or are you going to book some lessons from the off?

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Do any of your mates play golf who can go down the driving range with you and help you out at first or are you going to book some lessons from the off?

 

All of my mates are s*** hot golfers, and when we go down to the driving range, they seem unable to break off from t***ting the ball out of the range rather than doing what we went there for, i.e. to give me some help. So I think I'll book a lesson a week for the next 6 weeks, then try to get to the range at least 3-4 times between each lesson, and then see where I am after that.

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They'd be decent. No catch on that site, my old man took up golf a couple of years ago and bought a set just like that one and they're perfect for him really. They tend not be be the very top names, but who cares? The stuff is good quality.

 

I'd ignore what they claim is the full price - I got a set of 500 poker chips from for 45 quid that they claimed were 200 quid full price, which nobody would ever pay! - but they are excellent deals.

 

Things to look for would be clubs with slightly over sized heads and cavity back irons, as they are easier to hit. They don't give the same touch and control as the 'blades' that the pros use but are much, much better for the average player.

 

The hybrid clubs are handy to have as well once you start getting the hang of things, you'll eventually find them easier to hit than a fairway wood or long iron - some pros have started carryig them now too. Graphite shafts is a plus too, just make sure they aren't too stiff - again, the pros prefer from that way but you'd be better with something with more flex.

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Guest Sabre

I think that if you're serious then you should have some lessons to ensure you get the basics right from the start. It will build your confidence and allow you to enjoy yourself and gain some realism about what you can achieve when you get out there on the course.

 

I played when I was very young (10-12) so I didn't take lessons when I took it up again as an 18 year old but I only spent £100 on a full set of golf clubs including bag from American Golf (who I would agree are w*****s and you should never buy from there). My bunch of s*** golf clubs don't prevent me from playing to 18 and competing with my friends who have all spent far more on their clubs/balls/fashion accessories. I only play during the summer to get outside and I would only improve by 4 shots or so if I spent £400 on a great set of clubs. I enjoy spending the time in the sunshine with friends and that's what I love about the game.

 

Best word of advice I can give is to just play your own game, always play steady and be realistic about every shot. The biggest fault with amateur golfers is that they try to hit the ball too hard/like the pros. You'll only hit as smoothly and as far as your swing and technique will allow!

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All of my mates are s*** hot golfers, and when we go down to the driving range, they seem unable to break off from t***ting the ball out of the range rather than doing what we went there for, i.e. to give me some help. So I think I'll book a lesson a week for the next 6 weeks, then try to get to the range at least 3-4 times between each lesson, and then see where I am after that.

 

Good lad, I hope you get into it. May i suggest a time for your first lesson - Wed 21st May 7.45pm

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don't do it. Golf's s***

I still have an agreement with the Missus in as much as if I ever turn to her and say 'You know, what - I fancy buying a pipe and taking up Golf' she is to make out to the barn and blow my brains out. It's a reasonable failsafe.

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All of my mates are s*** hot golfers, and when we go down to the driving range, they seem unable to break off from t***ting the ball out of the range rather than doing what we went there for, i.e. to give me some help. So I think I'll book a lesson a week for the next 6 weeks, then try to get to the range at least 3-4 times between each lesson, and then see where I am after that.

 

 

Absolutely the correct answer.

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So when would the time be right to move from the safety of the Driving range to the big bad world of the course?

 

I think as soon as you can hit the thing it's good to get onto a 9 hole somewhere each week between your driving range practice. Whacking balls endlessly in all directions with no consequence on the range can develop some bad habits early on, it's good to post a score and try to improve on it.

 

The important thing is to find a shorter 9 hole course which is more for beginners to keep learning on and there's no pressure to hit good shots and get round quickly. Don't try taking on the full 18 hole though until you feel confident you're getting it off the ground most of the time.

 

Good luck mate, I play off 7 and it's a great game!

Edited by Leo No.8
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Guest Raisbeck

Get a few cheap, short irons (8,9 etc) grab some balls and find a school playing field or local park where you can go and spend some time on your own with nobody watching! Thats what I did when I first start playing and still sometimes go out there if I cant be bothered going to the driving range.

 

Par 3 courses are definitely the way to go when you first start off, a full length course can be absolutely demoralizing for someone who cant hit the ball cleanly off the tee. You might only need a couple of irons, a putter and some kind of wedge to play round a little course like that.

 

Its a great game, good luck.

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