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stressederic

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They used to let Rudolf Hess walk up the Skirrid when he was captive in Monmouthshire.

Wasn't he one of the last people to be held at the Tower of London too?

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Definitely try and track it down, CC. There are groups and websites trying to map little known places of interest in Britain from the two world wars.

 

If you find anything, I know they'll be interested.

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Will do, mate.

 

By the way, I'm sure this will be on their radar, but the Padgate training camp was on the land immediately beyond the churchyard at the back and side of my house. First port of call for loads of RAF, Canadian and U.S. forces in and immediately after WW2.     

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Will do, mate.

 

By the way, I'm sure this will be on their radar, but the Padgate training camp was on the land immediately beyond the churchyard at the back and side of my house. First port of call for loads of RAF, Canadian and U.S. forces in and immediately after WW2.

That's pretty cool. Once I get home from this research trip I'll look up some of these websites and send you the links.

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For people who like this sort of thing and are on twitter there's an account @kaisersbattle which is going to be live tweeting the German Spring Offensives from 1918 almost minute by minute.The attacks started on 21st March so it's gearing up for 'zero hour' at the moment.

 

It's a joint endeavour through a fair few academic historians. I'm doing some stuff on allied relations but the whole thing should be incredibly interesting for the next few months.

Edited by stressederic

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Ta - love this kind of stuff :)

 

No worries. It should be really good but I imagine the account will be very active on the 21st March starting at about 2:30am I think!

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That puts me in mind of a story told to me by a Great Uncle, who as a very young man was conscripted and fought for Germany in WW2 primarily on the Eastern front. He was captured and was shipped half way around the world and ended up in the USA in a prisoner of war camp in, or near Alabama. They had to work in the cotton fields for part of the day but the black American “workers” there were made to work in the worst heat of the day and were treated far less humanely than the German PoW’s - given far fewer rations, worse sleeping arrangements etc. My Great Uncle and his mates used to give part of their rations/water and even money (the PoW’s were paid a wage) to them whenever they could, although they were largely kept separated.

 

It goes without saying that there were horrific atrocities and extreme prejudices at the time back home in Germany but my Great Uncle had been largely unaware of that, having grown up in a rural area of Germany for all of his young life. He was really quite taken aback by seeing first hand how Americans were treating their own countrymen with far less respect and greater contempt than they treated their “enemies” in war.

 

My Great Uncle was eventually shipped to England where he later met and married my Great Aunt (my Mother’s Aunt) and lived out the rest of his life in Oxfordshire.

Good story this Tommo. Sounds like novel in the making. 

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I'm not on Twitter. Bummer. Such a civilization rocking event that sadly goes a little too uncovered. It's great that people like you do this work Eric.

 

In many ways I'm history's greatest hero.

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You don't need a Twitter account - you can follow it from 

https://twitter.com/KaisersBattle

 

Nice one.

 

Some of the stuff that'll be up for the 21st and 22nd is amazing. The German guns opened fire after 4:30am and dropped 3 million shells on the British in 5 hours. Some men were basically rendered catatonic. You could just walk up to them and push them over. When the German infantry attacked it was through a heavy fog. You couldn't see more than a few feet in front of you. It meant hand to hand fighting in the fog. It must've been terrifying.

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It overwhelmed your timeline too badly so far, Gethin?

 

Honestly? I've been so busy with work stuff until about an hour ago - I've not been on Twitter so I couldn't tell :)

 

Think the best way to read this is just to go to the account's timeline (via the link I posted above) and do it in chunks - I did all the preamble up until about 11pm last night in one sitting and I'm going to do the same for today's stuff with a glass of wine in a bit 

 

It's really great stuff so far - really like the way other knowledgable accounts are chiming in with relevant stuff. It's mostly academics but it's accessible in the way it's all being presented 

 

Mind you, you never said that the guy behind the main account was a Bluenose b*****d  :bryanrobson:

Edited by Gethin

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Honestly? I've been so busy with work stuff until about an hour ago - I've not been on Twitter so I couldn't tell :)

 

Think the best way to read this is just to go to the account's timeline (via the link I posted above) and do it in chunks - I did all the preamble up until about 11pm last night in one sitting and I'm going to do the same for today's stuff with a glass of wine in a bit 

 

It's really great stuff so far - really like the way other knowledgable accounts are chiming in with relevant stuff. It's mostly academics but it's accessible in the way it's all being presented 

 

Mind you, you never said that the guy behind the main account was a Bluenose b*****d  :bryanrobson:

 

Yeah doing it all in one go over the course of the evening is probably the best way to do it. Particularly as there's been a lot of stuff over the course of today. We've all had to be careful with the scheduling of the tweets not to crash into each other's ongoing narratives!

 

The cynic in me finds it interesting which accounts have chimed in and which very pointedly have not. But that's a whole other story.

 

And yeah one of the main organisers is an Evertonian but a reasonable chap despite that flaw!

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Nice one.

 

Some of the stuff that'll be up for the 21st and 22nd is amazing. The German guns opened fire after 4:30am and dropped 3 million shells on the British in 5 hours. Some men were basically rendered catatonic. You could just walk up to them and push them over. When the German infantry attacked it was through a heavy fog. You couldn't see more than a few feet in front of you. It meant hand to hand fighting in the fog. It must've been terrifying.

Fascinating Eric. I wish I read more history. Might start, but then where do you begin with the whole span of human history.

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Fascinating Eric. I wish I read more history. Might start, but then where do you begin with the whole span of human history.

 

I'd start with any area you find vaguely interesting. Or, alternatively, paying significant amounts of money for anything I've written to fund my lifestyle through royalties. Your choice, obviously.

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They used to let Rudolf Hess walk up the Skirrid when he was captive in Monmouthshire.

 

 

There was a prison camp near Bridgend that I can clearly remember when I was a kid. It was right at the side of a main road. They had an escape from there too. They put all the top German Generals there. Hess must have been put somewhere different to them I guess because he wasn't military. 

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There was a prison camp near Bridgend that I can clearly remember when I was a kid. It was right at the side of a main road. They had an escape from there too. They put all the top German Generals there. Hess must have been put somewhere different to them I guess because he wasn't military.

Hess was moved around several times during the war but, before Nuremberg, probably served most of his time in Surrey. Afterwards obviously he went to Spandau.

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Hess was moved around several times during the war but, before Nuremberg, probably served most of his time in Surrey. Afterwards obviously he went to Spandau.

So true. Funny how it seems

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