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stressederic

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The University's spring term finished around March 20th next year and to celebrate my first term of teaching I'm planning on trying to get away for around 5 days to Tromso in Norway.

 

I've checked various websites about the Northern Lights and they say there's a decent enough chance of catching them in mid-March but I was wondering if any of our Norwegian forumites have been in Tromso around that time of year and whether they got to see the Aurora?

 

You can fly into Tromso direct now which is a big plus and I've always wanted to go and see the Aurora Borealis and I might not get another opportunity for a couple of years and am desperate to get it right.

 

Additionally, and on a slightly strange note, does anyone know if there is a graveyard or cemetary there?

 

Thanks!

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you get paid well in Brighton :o

my colleague spent a few days in Norway and on his return his first words were that he needed a second mortgage to visit Norway again!!

going out, beer, food etc all very very very expensive

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you get paid well in Brighton :o

my colleague spent a few days in Norway and on his return his first words were that he needed a second mortgage to visit Norway again!!

going out, beer, food etc all very very very expensive

This is true - Monte carlo is more expensive - but that's about it! :D

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I've seen them from Narvik and Haparanda (Sweden, similar latitude to Narvik) at around that time of year, so you should be OK.

 

A cemetary? :unsure:

 

Excellent!

 

An I've always made it a habit to visit cemetaries wherever I go and take pictures. I find them really interesting. I also figure I might as well get used to spending time in them now.

 

you get paid well in Brighton :o

my colleague spent a few days in Norway and on his return his first words were that he needed a second mortgage to visit Norway again!!

going out, beer, food etc all very very very expensive

 

Well it'll only really be a flying visit and I probably won't actually be spending tham much of my own money.

 

This is true - Monte carlo is more expensive - but that's about it! :D

 

Monte Carlo is bloody expensive.

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I'm biased towards Finland - so I'd point you in that direction ;) & Rovaniemi (the artic circle passes thro - it's a horrible town as the Germans destroyed it, but Santa lives there ;) )

 

actually the Finns have a very nice Christmas tradition to do with cemetaries. They visit and place candles so the whole place is a fabulously candlelit, esp in the deep deep darkness.

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it is quite nice actually - i think it's on christmas eve (which is their Christmas day really).

Everyone goes to their lost loved ones - and the place is packed! Just candlelight everywhere...What I found very nice is a site in the cemetary dedicated to those who are placed elsewhere - you can still leave a candle there for them.

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it is quite nice actually - i think it's on christmas eve (which is their Christmas day really).

Everyone goes to their lost loved ones - and the place is packed! Just candlelight everywhere...What I found very nice is a site in the cemetary dedicated to those who are placed elsewhere - you can still leave a candle there for them.

 

That sounds lovely. Might have to make a visit one year.

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Excellent!

 

An I've always made it a habit to visit cemetaries wherever I go and take pictures. I find them really interesting. I also figure I might as well get used to spending time in them now.

Well it'll only really be a flying visit and I probably won't actually be spending tham much of my own money.

Monte Carlo is bloody expensive.

I like cemetaries too from an historical standpoint. If you want a cracker, you should (apart from Highgate) visit a little one on a hill overlooking the sea at Clevedon just outside Bristol - full of the graves of romantic junkie poets, novelists and artists from the Victorian era and earlier - apparently in Regency times Clevedon was one of the places to be. The only occupants now though make Sniffer look like a teenager. They don't bury the dead in Clevedon anymore - they prop them up in bus shelters holding bingo tickets.

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I like cemetaries too from an historical standpoint. If you want a cracker, you should (apart from Highgate) visit a little one on a hill overlooking the sea at Clevedon just outside Bristol - full of the graves of romantic junkie poets, novelists and artists from the Victorian era and earlier - apparently in Regency times Clevedon was one of the places to be. The only occupants now though make Sniffer look like a teenager. They don't bury the dead in Clevedon anymore - they prop them up in bus shelters holding bingo tickets.

 

I might well do that at some point.

 

In a strange sense I'm more interested in the graves and the actual cemetary itself than the various occupants. I was at Pere Lachaise last year and there were huge groups going off on tours to see famous peoples graves. Couldn't have interested me less. I just wanted to get away from the crowds with my camera right in amongst all the graves that nobody ever goes to see or look at.

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I'm biased towards Finland - so I'd point you in that direction ;) & Rovaniemi (the artic circle passes thro - it's a horrible town as the Germans destroyed it, but Santa lives there ;) )

 

actually the Finns have a very nice Christmas tradition to do with cemetaries. They visit and place candles so the whole place is a fabulously candlelit, esp in the deep deep darkness.

Have you been to Turku and Oulu Dee? they're really nice places - very romantic, brightly painted clapperboard and ethnic-style housing (especially at Oulu) especially on the outskirts and near the waters edge. In winter, the Baltic regularly freezes (or it did - less so these days) near Oulu, and when the snow is sitting on the sea ice and you get a clear, dark night, the stars reflect in the semi-fozen snow, seperated from the sky by a the black band of the coastal houses and treeline. I love that part of the world.

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I'll assume you've been to Pere La Chaise, Paris?

Indeed - stayed with a friend in Paris many years ago for a couple of months and went then - as Eric implies - much better to go around (as I did) when it's quiet - it was raining too at the time which lent a certain suitably Hugo-esque quality to the walk.

Edited by fyds
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Have you been to Turku and Oulu Dee? they're really nice places - very romantic, brightly painted clapperboard and ethnic-style housing (especially at Oulu) especially on the outskirts and near the waters edge. In winter, the Baltic regularly freezes (or it did - less so these days) near Oulu, and when the snow is sitting on the sea ice and you get a clear, dark night, the stars reflect in the semi-fozen snow, seperated from the sky by a the black band of the coastal houses and treeline. I love that part of the world.

I haven't been to either yet! I've been most other places...I want to go to Karelia as well - something attracts me about that part of Finland! Hardy people!

Next year I think we are planning a long holiday in Finland, it's been hectic this summer.

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Indeed - stayed with a friend in Paris many years ago for a couple of months and went then - as Eric implies - much better to go around (as I did) when it's quiet - it was raining too at the time which lent a certain suitably Hugo-esque quality to the walk.

 

I really hate being near strangers (don't mind it with my friends) when I'm taking photos in graveyards. Inevitably someone will wander over to see what you're photographing and then they'll take a picture as well.

 

1) Firstly, f*** off and leave me alone

2) Secondly that's my picture, i saw it first.

3) Thirdly, you don't even know why you're taking the bloody picture or what it's of!

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I haven't been to either yet! I've been most other places...I want to go to Karelia as well - something attracts me about that part of Finland! Hardy people!

Next year I think we are planning a long holiday in Finland, it's been hectic this summer.

Don't forget to take Sibelius on your mp3 player!

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I really hate being near strangers (don't mind it with my friends) when I'm taking photos in graveyards. Inevitably someone will wander over to see what you're photographing and then they'll take a picture as well.

 

1) Firstly, f*** off and leave me alone

2) Secondly that's my picture, i saw it first.

3) Thirdly, you don't even know why you're taking the bloody picture or what it's of!

 

:lol:

 

I was once sat on a hillside at Buttermere in the lakes with the Missus, no-one about, sunny day, looking down the valley to the water far below. After a while, in this tranquil scene at the top of the valley there appeared a big, luxury coach. We watched it wind it's way down the sloping road until it stopped eventually, directly in front, but about 100 yards away, and about 200 feet lower than where we were sat. The moment the airbreaks heaved, the door opened, and out popped a swarm of japanese tourists, all chatting and shouting and trashing the silence, all armed with cameras. Despite the sunny day, flash lights could be seen going in all directions - they never moved more than a few yards from the coach. After about two minutes, they all got back on, the air breaks gushed once more and off they went down the valley and disappeared past the farm building way below, and all was silent again. It was surreal - like an impromptu scene from a Bunuel fim. We burst out laughing. I realised that many japanese tourists of that era probably had no idea where they had been or what they had seen until they got home and had their films developed. Very strange it was.

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:lol:

 

I was once sat on a hillside at Buttermere in the lakes with the Missus, no-one about, sunny day, looking down the valley to the water far below. After a while, in this tranquil scene at the top of the valley there appeared a big, luxury coach. We watched it wind it's way down the sloping road until it stopped eventually, directly in front, but about 100 yards away, and about 200 feet lower than where we were sat. The moment the airbreaks heaved, the door opened, and out popped a swarm of japanese tourists, all chatting and shouting and trashing the silence, all armed with cameras. Despite the sunny day, flash lights could be seen going in all directions - they never moved more than a few yards from the coach. After about two minutes, they all got back on, the air breaks gushed once more and off they went down the valley and disappeared past the farm building way below, and all was silent again. It was surreal - like an impromptu scene from a Bunuel fim. We burst out laughing. I realised that many japanese tourists of that era probably had no idea where they had been or what they had seen until they got home and had their films developed. Very strange it was.

 

:cold:

 

Nobody looks at anything anymore. Either go to take pictures or go to look. Don't try and do both. I've been to art galleries and museums in Vienna, Rome, Paris, Auschwitz etc and am constantly amazed at the amount of people who just snap away with their cameras without actually looking at anything.

 

Why?

 

Nobody is going to want to look at all those pictures when you get home. Why have you paid all that money just to fly over there and look through your camera? Save the money and google in.

 

More importantly though, get out of the f***ing way when everyone elsewants to look at the sculptures you f***ing heathen.

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Guest Kaizer

I lived in Tromsø from January to June in 2004, so I guess I can help you with some advice, you will be able to watch the Northern Lights if the conditions are right, but its no guarentee.

 

Here are a few links Destination Tromsø

 

Visit Norway

 

When it comes to a cementary there is one a few minutes walk away from Alfheim Stadium where Tromsø IL play their matches.

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:lol:

 

I was once sat on a hillside at Buttermere in the lakes with the Missus, no-one about, sunny day, looking down the valley to the water far below. After a while, in this tranquil scene at the top of the valley there appeared a big, luxury coach. We watched it wind it's way down the sloping road until it stopped eventually, directly in front, but about 100 yards away, and about 200 feet lower than where we were sat. The moment the airbreaks heaved, the door opened, and out popped a swarm of japanese tourists, all chatting and shouting and trashing the silence, all armed with cameras. Despite the sunny day, flash lights could be seen going in all directions - they never moved more than a few yards from the coach. After about two minutes, they all got back on, the air breaks gushed once more and off they went down the valley and disappeared past the farm building way below, and all was silent again. It was surreal - like an impromptu scene from a Bunuel fim. We burst out laughing. I realised that many japanese tourists of that era probably had no idea where they had been or what they had seen until they got home and had their films developed. Very strange it was.

 

I was once camping in the lakes and awoke one morning to lots of chattering japanese tourists oustide. I went and scouted out what they were so excited about.

 

There was about 50 of them all lined up by this tarn and then about 30 yards away was a fella stood on a rocky outcrop with 50 cameras laid out in front of him. He went along taking a picture with every camera. Once he was done he went and joined the crowd and someone else came up and went along the row of cameras taking a picture. This continued until every camera had every conceivable permatation of people captured in photographic form.

 

It was brilliantly hilarious

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