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aka Dus

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average first time around.........

 

You're joking me??

 

They were seminal.

 

(Speaking of which, also from Popbitch....

 

Happy Slapping is so 2005. To be too

cool for school these days you have to

do the Seagull.

 

In schools all over London, apparently,

break-times are seeing boys running into the

bogs to masturbate furiously, collect their

jizz in the palms of their hands, then go out

and find a younger kid.... then slap them in

the face while shouting "SEAGULL!"

 

Try it in the office when you're bored.)

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Bit concerned about that, as they can't possibly be as good as they were back then. Can they?

 

The two Roxy albums with Eno on are absolutely fecking fantastic albums - sheer genius. And the 3rd, 1st post-Eno, one is also mighty fine

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The thing I remember most about Roxy Music (they were never called that where I lived) was that they were the number one band for the biggest prick in our class at school. Everything about him was poxy. His other band? the Mahivishnu Orchestra...

 

RM always seemed to be more of a fashion statement than a musical phenomenon.

 

Not sure how the word seminal can be applied to them? The music world was incredibly active and creative in that era...

 

And, like Istanbul, I was there.

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There'd be an awful lot of schite from any year. The list above means 72 was a pretty good year, doesn't it? It's just post-punk propaganda that the early 70s were schit, they weren't.

 

10-20 good albums does not a good year make

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http://rateyourmusic.com/top_albums/year_is_1972

How feckin wrong can a statement be. :lol:

 

There are some seriously good albumns on that list. Interesting how there are some bands with two good records on it in one year; that would never happen today.

 

Can't believe "Slayed" is so low on the list.

 

Glad to hear the news about Roxy. Seriously good band them. Andy Mackay and Phil Manzanera are no slouches at all.

Edited by New York Red
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I also see that A-ha havea new album out. Probably one ofthe most the most under-appreciated bands of the 80s and still going 20 years later...

 

I've got their last 3 efforts since they got back together and they've all been better than REM/U2's latest one's.

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Will,

 

One of the reasons there were a lot of duff albums in 72 is because there were a lot of albums - it was, as I said, an incredibly active year.

 

I can't say that Roxy were Poxy because that enters the realms of subjectivity: never an argument to adopt, but I can ask the honourable gentleman above why he thinks Roxy were seminal? That doesn't necessarily mean they were good but it does mean that they started something of significance. Really? What?

 

Name five successful bands that owe their existence/achievements to Roxy Muxic...

 

(£1 a band...)

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Will,

 

One of the reasons there were a lot of duff albums in 72 is because there were a lot of albums - it was, as I said, an incredibly active year.

 

I can't say that Roxy were Poxy because that enters the realms of subjectivity: never an argument to adopt, but I can ask the honourable gentleman above why he thinks Roxy were seminal? That doesn't necessarily mean they were good but it does mean that they started something of significance. Really? What?

 

Name five successful bands that owe their existence/achievements to Roxy Muxic...

 

(£1 a band...)

 

Are you mental?

 

I am not one for NME mockerific arguments about music but Joy Division, The Smiths, The Cars and countless others have cited Roxy Music as a seminal influence.

 

And despite Eno leaving, you could argue (if you had the time and inclination) that they had a major role in influencing electronica of all descriptions.

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Joy Division, The Cars...?

 

about as important to music today as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are to the toy industry.

 

Check out music sales. You want to see numbers? Try checking out how much is still spent on Hendrix albums/videos... That's what you would call seminal music. Indeed, his whole career predated such giants as Joy Division.

 

Furthermore, how could electronic music circa 1972 be cited as getting the whole show moving?

 

Also rather interesting that Phil Manzanera is being mentioned (another thread) as part of the Dave Gilmour band for the Royal Albert hall. It would seem that he at least appreciates real dinosaurs.

 

I think my money is safe.

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Joy Division, The Cars...?

 

about as important to music today as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are to the toy industry.

 

Check out music sales. You want to see numbers? Try checking out how much is still spent on Hendrix albums/videos... That's what you would call seminal music. Indeed, his whole career predated such giants as Joy Division.

 

Furthermore, how could electronic music circa 1972 be cited as getting the whole show moving?

 

Also rather interesting that Phil Manzanera is being mentioned (another thread) as part of the Dave Gilmour band for the Royal Albert hall. It would seem that he at least appreciates real dinosaurs.

 

I think my money is safe.

 

I'm not going to argue with a 'muso' about the meaning of the word seminal.

 

But your insistence on the importance of sales degrades your argument to irrelevance.

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Hendrix, chosen as an example, still sells in significant quantities because people, in significant numbers, still appreciate the music.

 

A fair proportion of such sales are related to oldies buying new formats/collections/better recordings etc... an indication that the music is much loved and has had a great influence on their lives - whether as a form of enjoyment or as a stimulus to their own musical creativity.

 

Forgive me for being rather agressive on this point, but I have never ever heard of anyone doing Joy Division covers and certainly no impersonations. When I was a teenager though, Hendrix wannabes were ten-a-penny. I remember well a gig in the school music room to this effect. Our shared attitude regarding the scheduled event was that someone in Form 6 (we were Form 3 and Hendrix was still alive) would never be able to tickle the frets well enough to get away with the cheek of playing Hendrix. We were right too. Nice try though.

 

Hendrix was a living god; he made a lot of people completely rethink guitar playing.

 

I recall an interview with Martin Barre (guitarist of J Tull) in which he gave his first meeting with Hendrix as a magic moment in his own career - saw him rehearsing on his own, sitting on an amp backstage and doing things with his guitar that others dreamed of. Barre, of course, was the man whom Jimmy Page watched lay down the lead for Aqualung in one take and, famously, said that he couldn't believe it. That's where we begin with a word like seminal. Barre looked up to Hendrix as a musician.

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Oh, and as a point of information: I have been reading up on Joy Division to test my ignorance and have not yet found a single reference to Roxy Music (where this thread-theme-thingy started) as being an important, nay, The important influence in their creation and evolution. Iggy Pop and The Sex Pistols were credited though (for different reasons).

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