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Another example of depraved indifference to other people.

A player from the LA Dodgers tested positive, was pulled from the team's World Series winning game. Yet he still celebrated the win, maskless, with his fellow players on the pitch after the game.

 

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Well, quick update.. my good lady's back home and essentially been given the 'you should be ok after a few days in bed now' discharge. Even getting her home shows what an ill thought out sh*tshow th

Two weeks quarantine done, now at the airport with a 7am beer. Tastes bloody amazing. Now I get to see my wife for the first time in 6 weeks. 

News of our kitchen has spread around Bham - we've been doing deliveries over but now there's a Q at the door each night. Planning meeting tonight to decide how to cater/cope. Heartbreaking stuff. And

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22 minutes ago, Romario said:

One person infecting 53 people is mad.

 

A very pertinent case with regard to understanding the dynamics of indoor transmission was a choir rehearsal in Washington State, in the United States, in March. Only 61 of the 120 members of the choir attended the rehearsal, and efforts were made to maintain a safe distance and hygiene measures. But unknown to them, they were in a maximum risk scenario: no masks, no ventilation, singing and sharing space over a prolonged period. Just one infected person infected 53 people in the space of two and a half hours. Some of those infected were 14 meters away, so only aerosols would explain the transmission. Two of those who caught the virus died.

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A well ventilated classroom not so risky then. Enforcing the ventilation is becoming the tricky part now. It's really cold in classrooms and some teachers are not opening the windows enough.

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I’m wondering if this accounts for much lower rates of infection in places where air conditioning and ventilation is standard due to the climate. I’m thinking of Australia and Thailand but I’m sure there will be contradictory examples that I haven’t thought of.

UK and mainland Europe, with its emphasis on keeping warm enclosed spaces throughout the winter months is the obvious counterpoint.

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4 hours ago, Romario said:

It's very interesting that - thanks for posting.

From the same website I thought this was interesting too

https://english.elpais.com/spanish_news/2020-06-17/an-analysis-of-three-covid-19-outbreaks-how-they-happened-and-how-they-can-be-avoided.html?rel=mas

 

2 hours ago, Falconhoof said:

I’m wondering if this accounts for much lower rates of infection in places where air conditioning and ventilation is standard due to the climate. I’m thinking of Australia and Thailand but I’m sure there will be contradictory examples that I haven’t thought of.

UK and mainland Europe, with its emphasis on keeping warm enclosed spaces throughout the winter months is the obvious counterpoint.

In that second link they show an example of a restaurant in China that had (pretty basic) air con but this might have made the scenario slightly worse

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2 hours ago, Falconhoof said:

I’m wondering if this accounts for much lower rates of infection in places where air conditioning and ventilation is standard due to the climate. I’m thinking of Australia and Thailand but I’m sure there will be contradictory examples that I haven’t thought of.

UK and mainland Europe, with its emphasis on keeping warm enclosed spaces throughout the winter months is the obvious counterpoint.

Florida?

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1 hour ago, Tommok said:

But more effective air con and ventilation does generally seem to help

Air con has little to do with air quality or "fresh air" 

Most large buildings in the western world built after 1990 will likely have good quality ventilation system. How it's operated and maintained is more the issue.

Had the pleasure of listening to Radio 2 earlier. There's a lot of people annoyed that their little kids can't go trick or treating. Poor dabs.

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8 minutes ago, D.Boon said:

Air con has little to do with air quality or "fresh air" 

Most large buildings in the western world built after 1990 will likely have good quality ventilation system. How it's operated and maintained is more the issue.

Yeah the example given in the link was of a restaurant that had an "aircon" system which was basically recirculating air in one section of the room so the infected droplets were continuously being blown out across that one section of the room.

Proper ventilation providing fresh air and not just circulating the air, would seemingly have helped in that scenario.

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14 minutes ago, D.Boon said:

Air con has little to do with air quality or "fresh air" 

Most large buildings in the western world built after 1990 will likely have good quality ventilation system. How it's operated and maintained is more the issue.

Had the pleasure of listening to Radio 2 earlier. There's a lot of people annoyed that their little kids can't go trick or treating. Poor dabs.

Its one more thing, and won't be the last, they can't do in an already s*** year for kids. 

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9 minutes ago, Tommok said:

Yeah the example given in the link was of a restaurant that had an "aircon" system which was basically recirculating air in one section of the room so the infected droplets were continuously being blown out across that one section of the room.

Proper ventilation providing fresh air and not just circulating the air, would seemingly have helped in that scenario.

Yup. One part of the guidance that enabled us to reopen was (in the absence of air-con) the first thing we should do after a guest checks out was strip the bedding and towels, then open the windows and leave the room for at least two hours to let fresh air circulate in

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1 hour ago, Gethin said:

Yup. One part of the guidance that enabled us to reopen was (in the absence of air-con) the first thing we should do after a guest checks out was strip the bedding and towels, then open the windows and leave the room for at least two hours to let fresh air circulate in

to be fair that's probably best advice to take when I eventually get down that way and stay...... :)

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Paris has emptied as everyone (who can) left last night to avoid “suffering” lockdown in Paris. They’ve all buggered off to the regions for the duration and caused a cumulative 430 mile traffic jam. The regions are less than delighted as the Paris region has the highest rate of infection in France 

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1 hour ago, Tosh said:

Paris has emptied as everyone (who can) left last night to avoid “suffering” lockdown in Paris. They’ve all buggered off to the regions for the duration and caused a cumulative 430 mile traffic jam. The regions are less than delighted as the Paris region has the highest rate of infection in France 

The houses either side of me have suddenly got people in them

they’re normally empty

I've had to fill out an ‘attestation’ on my phone to be able to leave home today

one false move and it’s a 135 euro fine

then 3000

then JAIL!!! 

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