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Greg Dyke and the FA Commission Report


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So he's basically proposed a B Team League, 'strategic loans'/feeder clubs and to limit the number of non-EU players outside of the top division.

 

Oh and he'd like a few more 3G pitches.

 

Fully backed by the likes of Ian Ayre and Roy Hodgson ... which immediately made me suspicious.

 

The text below the phot of Luke Shaw made me laugh in The Telegraph

 

So the whole structure of the professional game in this country is being changed in order to support the England national team?

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So he's basically proposed a B Team League, 'strategic loans'/feeder clubs and to limit the number of non-EU players outside of the top division.

 

Oh and he'd like a few more 3G pitches.

 

Fully backed by the likes of Ian Ayre and Roy Hodgson ... which immediately made me suspicious.

 

The text below the phot of Luke Shaw made me laugh in The Telegraph

 

So the whole structure of the professional game in this country is being changed in order to support the England national team?

 

It's going to absolutely crush the smaller clubs and put loads of them out of business.

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lot of gnashing of teeth about erosion of tradition and dreams and hopes of lower league clubs, but i haven't actually heard anything that cogent as yet in the anti- argument.

 

whether you agree with it or not this commission was charged with changing fortunes of the national team. player development a big part of that and convincing evidence that b teams play a big part in helping this on the continent. apart from that seems to me there's as much chance of this supporting the lower echelons as the opposite.

 

alaves, for example, still rose from bottom tier in spain to uefa cup final despite the existence of barca and madrid b, neither of whom dominate those lower divisions or anything like.

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So he's basically proposed a B Team League, 'strategic loans'/feeder clubs and to limit the number of non-EU players outside of the top division.

 

 

Greg Dyke and Nigel Farage, sitting in a tree. ;)

 

Not that we've not advocated a "B team" approach for the ressies/U21s so they develop AND get competitive football

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There doesn't seem to be much mention of coaching and developing young (i.e. teenage and younger) players.

I infer that they are not rating the coaching going on at Cambridge United today and are using the famous "trickle down" effect of having one of Mourinho's accolytes coaching their opposition twice a season. However, below that (age-wise), they seem to be relying on the current model.

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However, below that (age-wise), they seem to be relying on the current model.

 

 

Bizarre.

 

Seems to me to suggest that these players are out there (products of the youth coaching structure) but they are just not making the breakthrough because of those pesky foreigners.

 

And Arsene Wenger then comes on to say that there is not enough technical education of young players in this country - there are too many competitive fixtures for 8-17 year olds.

 

 

Hmmm, that makes complete sense to me.

 

Accrington Stanley have the right idea.

 

They're on Twitter now ...

 

 

"In 2016/17, we can achieve our dream ... we'll finally be able to play Stoke City reserves in the Football League"

 

and

 

"To increase the number of English players in the top flight we're going to launch a B Team and apply to join the Premier League."

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I've spoken to coaches at kids academies who have said that they look for a specific kind of player, an athlete, who they can teach some skills to rather than a skilled/talented kid. They reason that skills can be taught/learned to a kid with the basic physical attributes (the two main ones being they have to be fast and big) - from what I have seen though they then just try and get them to run faster and grow bigger.

 

I'm sure some academies are far better than others (and nothing like those described above) but I have heard that from coaches at a couple of different academies (down south). It's the coaching at that age that needs addressing.

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Said it before and will say it again

 

Greg Dyke is a pandering moron

 

So more English players means a better national team??

 

Foreign players aren't the issue here

 

Ironic thing is the vast majority of England support comes from fans whose team play in the football leagues, these proposals would most likely damage their teams

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exactly. If you're good enough, you're good enough. If you're not you're not.

 

It's the grass roots coaching that needs looking at.

 

How the f*** does an 8 year old know their best position?

 

it's hard to talk in absolutes about what might have been for good young players who don't make it. but there's obviously an issue in this country compared to others in bringing through talent. i don't think necessarily think this addresses all the problems or even half of them. but by the same token i don't agree with your initial statement: if you're good enough at 18 or 20, then yes you're good enough, obviously. that doesn't mean you simply aren't good enough. and i think there is a problem both in terms of bringing through top quality through the existing lower league structure and through the academies of the top sides to very competitive first teams. to use the spanish example, mata, negredo, soldado, diego lopez, arbeloa, luis garcia (the other one) all played lots of games for madrid b without making a debut (or many appearances) for the full side, a few of them were relegated together with the reserve team. but they were exposed at those ages to competitive football and obviously being at real madrid to an environment that was relevant to top levels. barcelona obviously even more successful in this. but also valenica. bayern in germany with likes of muller and kroos etc. all played b team football.

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it's hard to talk in absolutes about what might have been for good young players who don't make it. but there's obviously an issue in this country compared to others in bringing through talent. i don't think necessarily think this addresses all the problems or even half of them. but by the same token i don't agree with your initial statement: if you're good enough at 18 or 20, then yes you're good enough, obviously. that doesn't mean you simply aren't good enough. and i think there is a problem both in terms of bringing through top quality through the existing lower league structure and through the academies of the top sides to very competitive first teams. to use the spanish example, mata, negredo, soldado, diego lopez, arbeloa, luis garcia (the other one) all played lots of games for madrid b without making a debut (or many appearances) for the full side, a few of them were relegated together with the reserve team. but they were exposed at those ages to competitive football and obviously being at real madrid to an environment that was relevant to top levels. barcelona obviously even more successful in this. but also valenica. bayern in germany with likes of muller and kroos etc. all played b team football.

 

 

Competitive matches that came after they'd been well taught in the academies ... it's the early years that are the problem in this country.

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Yeah maybe - but which would it make sense to address first?

 

take your point, but i'd imagine/hope there's some attempt to address both. there's a huge amount of kids going through these academies from formative years, and even at the relatively successful or well-intentioned academies there tends to be a log jam when it comes to the final step because of the pressure for results.

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take your point, but i'd imagine/hope there's some attempt to address both.

 

 

 

This report would have been the perfect vehicle to do that - but I can't see they've addressed it at all, have they?

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Important concerns for The FA around coaching and grassroots facilities are being addressed and will be reported on in more detail over the coming months, with the acknowledgement that much more work needs to be done.

 

again i'm not saying this is the panacea, or even an answer to part of the problem. remains to be seen. and i can't talk with the same authority about how it'll effect smaller clubs that some seem able to. just find some of the response to it a little knee jerk.

 

rafa talked positively about this system while he was here. although admittedly only from the big club perspective.

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There doesn't seem to be much mention of coaching and developing young (i.e. teenage and younger) players.

 

A separate report on grassroots football will be released in a few months apparently.

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Isn't the main problem with the English national team that it's been Badly coached and prepared? We've had no shortage of talented players recently but when they get together, they're by and large wretched.

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it's hard to talk in absolutes about what might have been for good young players who don't make it. but there's obviously an issue in this country compared to others in bringing through talent. i don't think necessarily think this addresses all the problems or even half of them. but by the same token i don't agree with your initial statement: if you're good enough at 18 or 20, then yes you're good enough, obviously. that doesn't mean you simply aren't good enough. and i think there is a problem both in terms of bringing through top quality through the existing lower league structure and through the academies of the top sides to very competitive first teams. to use the spanish example, mata, negredo, soldado, diego lopez, arbeloa, luis garcia (the other one) all played lots of games for madrid b without making a debut (or many appearances) for the full side, a few of them were relegated together with the reserve team. but they were exposed at those ages to competitive football and obviously being at real madrid to an environment that was relevant to top levels. barcelona obviously even more successful in this. but also valenica. bayern in germany with likes of muller and kroos etc. all played b team football.

 

It may be a slow transformation but do you not think that we are starting to see a natural shift in the type of football being played in the lower leagues, I'm thinking more Championship and League One at this stage?

 

In the last decade or so we have seen a big shift in the football being played in the PL, where the cloggers have all but disappeared. As mentioned its a slow transformation, a trickle down effect if you like but the style/philosophy of football lower down is definitely improving which can only be a good thing long term. Looking back at say the last 4-5 seasons pretty much all the newly promoted teams have and are trying to play football as it should be, on the deck. Hopefully this natural progression will continue and eventually trickle down even further.

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