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14 games behind a paywall isn't the biggest deal ever but this will leave a bad taste for a lot of people. Foreign rights is one thing but an amateur organisation choosing to put some of its games beyond the reach of a significant proportion of the people that volunteered for years to train, play and build up clubs doesn't sit right.

 

One thing wrong in the article is that hurling and Gaelic aren't Ireland's most popular sports, football is.

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They're taking over the matches TV3 had.

 

Whatever about the pros and cons of the Sky deal, thank f*** TV3 have lost the rights. Their picture quality is absolutely shocking. It's hard to see the ball in hurling watching it on that sorry excuse for a television station.

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Are these 14 games matches that otherwise would be live on Setanta/RTE ?

 

 

Yeah, free to air TV3. Setanta have league games and were free to watch online for Eircom broadband subscribers until they suddenly weren't at the back end of last year.

 

I wonder what Sky can bring to live production, over and above extending reach in to the living rooms of the UK via SS3? Extra cameras perhaps, as they did with football. Loadsa hype, as they did with football.

 

Does it mean that RTE broadcasts of matches on Sky/Virgin will be blocked, especially up here in the occupied 6 counties/pravince/Norn Iron?

 

It's an interesting question but I doubt it. Isn't RTE broadcasting in to the north covered by some kind of Good Friday clause? As it is, they trample all over Uefa rights, BBC/ITV territorial exclusivity rights for movies, programmes etc so my guess is that the fudge will continue. Which is very Irish.

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It's a positive thing in one way, allowing a global audience see these sports can only be good. I can't however work out how the GAA can continue along the not paying players route whilst doing multi-million pound deals like this. It leaves a sour taste that many of the thousands of GAA volunteers won't have access to these games without going the pub or subscribing.

 

I guarantee you this will catch the imaginations of people who've not seen it before, way more so than NFL and similar.

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I never watched GAA matched on TV3 and have sky in any case but I can see the problem with moving games from free to air broadcasting to subscription especially considering it's an amateur sport and one often reliant on volunteers.

 

I did think that the GAA was actually good at getting money down to the grass roots and if that remains the case when the money increases it can only be a good thing. I'm also not sure about football being the most popular sport in Ireland.

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I never watched GAA matched on TV3 and have sky in any case but I can see the problem with moving games from free to air broadcasting to subscription especially considering it's an amateur sport and one often reliant on volunteers.

 

I did think that the GAA was actually good at getting money down to the grass roots and if that remains the case when the money increases it can only be a good thing. I'm also not sure about football being the most popular sport in Ireland.

 

Sky are only giving them an extra half million more than TV3 were but it is a longer term game I suppose. The function of the GAA remains a community one though, not an empire builder. They need to not lose sight of that but restricting a significant proportion of people (the elderly and the young in particular) from seeing their own county play in important games they cannot attend is a step in that direction.

 

Football is more popular than hurling and gaelic put together, by a distance. Department of sport numbers of numbers participating demonstrate that regularly.

 

Used to be on Setanta didn't it? I've definitely seen it in pubs over here.

 

Most of them via RTÉ on an Irish Sky box I'd say.

Edited by aka Dus
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It's a positive thing in one way, allowing a global audience see these sports can only be good. I can't however work out how the GAA can continue along the not paying players route whilst doing multi-million pound deals like this.

 

Not just the players (the Gaelic Players Association are delighted) but why not the trainers and staff throughout the pyramid? Including teachers in primary and secondary schools who are crucial to the development of players who go on to coin it for the GAA.

 

The games deserve exposure but am not sure that this is the way an amateur organisation built by volunteers is the way should be doing it.

 

 

 

 

 

This is amusing: http://www.todayfm.com/Gift-Sky-Sports-GAA

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Football is more popular than hurling and gaelic put together, by a distance. Department of sport numbers of numbers participating demonstrate that regularly.

 

How much of this is actually organised, I see GAA pitches lit up on my way home every night almost I don't see people out training football. I also don't see local and countly clubs colours and banners all over the roadside for anything other than GAA.

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How much of this is actually organised, I see GAA pitches lit up on my way home every night almost I don't see people out training football. I also don't see local and countly clubs colours and banners all over the roadside for anything other than GAA.

 

 

GAA grass roots is organised way better than football, but Dus is right, football wins hands down. Thing is and you made the point earlier, the GAA ARE good at re-distributing funds down the chain. There is no such thing as a GAA club without appropriate facilities for training, playing, changing, showering, socialising, etc.. This would be out of the ordinary for football at grass roots level. Still people getting stripped on pitches and a lot of pitch sharing still going on. There is a serious cross-over now, GAA not the preserve in a spectacle sense for just its members. I'm probably typical of that, not affiliated to any club yet go to a lot of league and championship games up and down the country.

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How much of this is actually organised, I see GAA pitches lit up on my way home every night almost I don't see people out training football. I also don't see local and countly clubs colours and banners all over the roadside for anything other than GAA.

 

Think it has to be registered players to make the count.

 

You've lived there long enough now to realise that football remains a largely working class sport, the GAA being funded by the rural middle class and rugby getting well supported by the urban middle class and corporate Ireland. Broad brush stroke generalisations for sure but there is no comparison between the reach of GAA clubs or rugby clubs and football clubs when it comes to access to local fundraising. As for the colours on the road, the answer to that lies somewhere in the state of the highest level of football in Ireland and the fascination with the game in Britain.

 

But football remains hugely popular and widely played, something to do rather than to be seen doing. For the obvious reason of it being the greatest game, despite the social advantage that goes with associating yourself with rugby or GAA in many parts of Ireland. Football does itself no favours with how it organises itself but it retains its status. It's a bit of a contradiction that might change with time, as 'floating voters' make a point of honour in decrying the excesses in football and the lack of authenticity. It would make for a good book, the whys and the hows of the perception of football in Ireland.

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I've been convinced for some time that Gaelic Football will eventually become a world-wide sport and I think this will definitely help.

 

We had a Gaelic team from South Africa up in our work last week and they were going off to the Middle East for a tournament involving teams from the US, Australia, Middle and Far East.

 

As long as the GAA pump the investment into the grass roots and maybe even provide Sky Sports in all GAA social clubs.

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It's a positive thing in one way, allowing a global audience see these sports can only be good. I can't however work out how the GAA can continue along the not paying players route whilst doing multi-million pound deals like this. It leaves a sour taste that many of the thousands of GAA volunteers won't have access to these games without going the pub or subscribing.

 

I guarantee you this will catch the imaginations of people who've not seen it before, way more so than NFL and similar.

 

Setanta broadcast the games in Asia and I don't know if there has been much of an increase in interest!

 

I hate the idea of Murdoch having anything to do with something I love on a point of principle. I felt the same way when he bought the rights to football and that hasn't changed no matter how much the quality of the coverage has 'improved'.

 

 

 

 

 

I've been convinced for some time that Gaelic Football will eventually become a world-wide sport and I think this will definitely help.

 

We had a Gaelic team from South Africa up in our work last week and they were going off to the Middle East for a tournament involving teams from the US, Australia, Middle and Far East.

 

As long as the GAA pump the investment into the grass roots and maybe even provide Sky Sports in all GAA social clubs.

 

They're are GAA clubs in Singapore and Malaysia but there made up pretty much exclusively of ex-pats and that hasn't hanged in the five years I've been here.

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Think it has to be registered players to make the count.

 

You've lived there long enough now to realise that football remains a largely working class sport, the GAA being funded by the rural middle class and rugby getting well supported by the urban middle class and corporate Ireland. Broad brush stroke generalisations for sure but there is no comparison between the reach of GAA clubs or rugby clubs and football clubs when it comes to access to local fundraising. As for the colours on the road, the answer to that lies somewhere in the state of the highest level of football in Ireland and the fascination with the game in Britain.

 

But football remains hugely popular and widely played, something to do rather than to be seen doing. For the obvious reason of it being the greatest game, despite the social advantage that goes with associating yourself with rugby or GAA in many parts of Ireland. Football does itself no favours with how it organises itself but it retains its status. It's a bit of a contradiction that might change with time, as 'floating voters' make a point of honour in decrying the excesses in football and the lack of authenticity. It would make for a good book, the whys and the hows of the perception of football in Ireland.

 

So I agree with some of this and I accept that football is more popular, I'm surprised but have no reason to doubt.

 

I'm rural though and haven't lived in Dublin for 7 years so the GAA thing seems much bigger, I see more Louth jerseys shopping in Ardee, a working class town, than I do football jerseys so I'm not sure of your description of the middle class demographic for GAA and I'm also reasonably sure that a load of Dublin GAA clubs remain solidly working class. I do think you've a point mind and working class towns with football clubs get well supported but their catchment is obviously smaller than the county GAA club. Sligo Dundalk and Drogheda being cases in point.

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I helped set up the GAA club in Malmö. I don't play too regularly any more due to circumstance but we have lads from Iceland, Iran, Brits, Aussies, an American, a Canadian all playing. Some of them at quite respectable level. Our ladies team plays Oslo regularly and pretty much their entire team is made up of Norwegians. Ours has only a handful of Irish. Loads of German girls involved in the Munich ladies team, I am sure it's not uncommon.

 

You're right, the majoroty of people involved are ex-pats and the leagues outside Ireland, (and GB and the USA, where there are long established structures) are growing at an amazing rate. But am not convinced how ready the world is to swoon at the feet of Gaelic Football, though it's a novel spectacle that people with a good 'ball sense', as they say in Sweden, can get very quickly.

 

Personally, I think hurling is a far better sport to watch than Gaelic but even among the Irish there are very few that know one end of a hurl from the other.

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They're are GAA clubs in Singapore and Malaysia but there made up pretty much exclusively of ex-pats and that hasn't hanged in the five years I've been here.

These guys were all South Africans and they came up to the building clapping and singing, it was class. There wasn't much height among them, but the organisers said they were fast as f*ck and really hard to play against, their fitness levels are unbelievable apparently.

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How much of this is actually organised, I see GAA pitches lit up on my way home every night almost I don't see people out training football. I also don't see local and countly clubs colours and banners all over the roadside for anything other than GAA.

 

The AUL alone has nearly as many teams as Dublin GAA's adult leagues. That's before you even start counting the Leinster Senior League, Amateur Football League, United Churches League or Leinster Football League

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