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The State Education System


Flight

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State education. Anyone have insights into this ? Something I wish I'd known a lot more about earlier in my life.

 

 

 

The whole state education system was built on the premise that isolation from first hand information and fragmentation of the abstract information presented by teachers would result in obedient and subordinate graduates, properly respectful of arbitrary orders.

 

American educationists imported three major ideas from Prussia.

 

1. The first was that the purpose of state schooling was not intellectual training but the conditioning of children "to obedience, subordination, and collective life." Thus, memorisation outranked thinking.

 

2. Second, whole ideas were broken into fragmented "subjects" and school days were divided into fixed periods "so that self-motivation to learn would be muted by ceaseless interruptions."

 

3. Third, the state was posited as the true parent of children. All of this was done in the name of a scientific approach to education."

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBNh543A81U

 

 

 

I believe that one day we will regard the second half of the nineteenth century and the whole of the twentieth as an educational dark age, lit only by the likes of Ivan Illich, John Holt, John Taylor Gatto and our own Roland Meighan and the thousands of parents led by pioneers like Joy Baker who chose to home educate their own children outside the state system.

Edited by Flight
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Haven't WATCHED THE VIDEO yet, but I think it is possibly true that the regulation of the school day was meant to condition children and prepare them for the world of work, but a lot of what is posited uip there just sounds like paranoid b******s.

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Just googled "American educationists imported three major ideas from Prussia.", which led to this - http://jim.com/schools.htm, which includes this amazing piece of nonsense:

What does that have to do with the United States? Early in our history, education was mainly a private, free-market activity—no compulsory attendance laws, and no school taxes. That system produced the most literate, independent-thinking, self-reliant people in history.
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Just googled "American educationists imported three major ideas from Prussia.", which led to this - http://jim.com/schools.htm, which includes this amazing piece of nonsense:

 

What does that have to do with the United States? Early in our history, education was mainly a private, free-market activity—no compulsory attendance laws, and no school taxes. That system produced the most literate, independent-thinking, self-reliant people in history.

 

the mormons?

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Floght if you aren't familiar with the home school movement in the US then you probably should be before posting this.

 

 

Yeah you're probably right. Was just a quick google after reading a reasonable article in a recent National Geographic about it. Prolly should have just copy/pasted that article.

 

It's always seemed bizarre to me what is and isn't taught at school, though and the syllabus being pushed by this Government is concerning.

Edited by Flight
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you sure? What did I say other than he should familiarise himself with the home school movement. It's not like I advised him to get conservapedia's perspective

"the home school movement" is being presented as one movement. Its a tough subject to address. could get interesting :lol:

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"the home school movement" is being presented as one movement. Its a tough subject to address. could get interesting :lol:/>

 

Well kinda but the video he linked and the comments made refer to a specific element of the home school movement. In fact I think I'm good with the description in any case given that one of the arguments used in favour is the inability of schools to provide moral and religious instruction.

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