Jump to content
By fans, for fans. By fans, for fans. By fans, for fans.

Rogers comes out as gay - quits football


mooks

Recommended Posts

Hmmm ... misleading headlines aside isn't it time for football to step into the 21st century?

 

http://espnfc.com/news/story/_/id/1341744/rogers-comes-out-in-blog-post;-quits-football?cc=5901

 

Former Leeds midfielder Robbie Rogers, who won 18 caps for the United States national team, has announced he is gay on a blog post which also claimed he was leaving football.

 

Rogers, 25, previously played for Leeds United and Columbus Crew, but left League One side Stevenage after a loan spell last month, and wrote on his blog that he had been afraid of revealing his sexuality.

 

"Secrets can cause so much internal damage," he wrote. "People love to preach about honesty, how honesty is so plain and simple. Try explaining to your loved ones after 25 years you are gay.

 

"Try convincing yourself that your creator has the most wonderful purpose for you even though you were taught differently. Now is my time to step away. It's time to discover myself away from football.''

 

No British-based professional player has come out since ex-Norwich and Nottingham Forest striker Justin Fashanu in 1990. He committed suicide eight years later aged 37.

 

There has been a thawing of attitudes to the prospect of gay players in Britain in recent times, however. Last month, West Ham winger Matt Jarvis became the third footballer to feature on the cover of the UK's best-selling gay magazine, Attitude, after David Beckham and Freddie Ljungberg. Although not gay himself, Jarvis insisted gay footballers should feel comfortable enough to come out.

 

Meanwhile, Clarke Carlisle, the chairman of the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA), said last year he had been engaged in discussions with eight gay players but none of them wished to go public.

 

And Gordon Taylor, chairman of the Professional Footballers' Association, told Press Association Sport: "I'm pleased that he's come out for his own sake. We do have players who've said that, while they are gay, they don't feel comfortable enough to come out.

 

"It's not dissimilar to many black players, and we need to create a safe environment for them on and off the field. If there is abuse, that needs to be dealt with by all the football family.

 

"It's no bad thing that he's been brave enough to come out. We know of players who are playing who are gay who've not had that confidence as yet. But, as the rest of the world becomes more civilised, hopefully that will come.''

 

Taylor added that the PFA remains committed to programmes of education on all topics relating to discrimination, but that the issue is one that needs to be tackled by society as a whole.

 

"There needs to be a feeling that there is a comfortable environment for everybody,'' he said. "We're aware through our sporting chance clinic that players who deal with such issues at the moment feel they would be targeted and the attention would no longer be on them as a footballer.

 

"That's a real challenge. But the game has to be up to that. If we're going to claim to be the major sport in the world, both in terms of spectators and participation, then we've got to use that to create a better example.''

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 120
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

The way I read it, it's not that he needs to clear his mind but he's afraid of the treatment he would receive from opposing fans (and possibly his own). And he's almost certainly right.

 

I do think, however, he could get by in the MLS where the atmosphere is much less tribal ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The way I read it, it's not that he needs to clear his mind but he's afraid of the treatment he would receive from opposing fans (and possibly his own). And he's almost certainly right.

 

I do think, however, he could get by in the MLS where the atmosphere is much less tribal ...

 

Not sure, I read his blog and it's mostly about his inner struggle. This may or may not have impacted his form and ability to play to his potential

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Taylor added that the PFA remains committed to programmes of education on all topics relating to discrimination, but that the issue is one that needs to be tackled by society as a whole.

 

The issue of gay footballers being too scared to admit their sexuality for fear of the treatment they will get within the game from their fellow professionals and match going fans is definitely an issue for society as a whole to solve rather than the PFA.

 

Easy this union lark. The massive c***.

Edited by D.Boon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's nothing to be glib about, is it? You're presuming that there are loads of gay footballers waiting to come out or that there's a quota of gay footballers that once reached will 'normalise' it for once and for all. There's no reason to think there's more than a handful of gay professional footballers in these leagues, even the PFA say there have been discussions with only 7 or 8. It's not going to be 'solved' by people coming out because there's nothing to solve in how this story is being framed except the responsibility of the media to be logical. It's another s****storm of inductive reasoning: there are gay people > there are gay footballers > sometimes some football fans are c**** and sing offensive songs = gay footballers are scared of coming out because the culture of football will see them go the way of Justin Fashanu.

 

Once again the press are presenting football as having a 'responsibility' to break down social barriers that have nothing to do with the sport.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's nothing to be glib about, is it? You're presuming that there are loads of gay footballers waiting to come out or that there's a quota of gay footballers that once reached will 'normalise' it for once and for all. There's no reason to think there's more than a handful of gay professional footballers in these leagues, even the PFA say there have been discussions with only 7 or 8. It's not going to be 'solved' by people coming out because there's nothing to solve in how this story is being framed except the responsibility of the media to be logical. It's another s****storm of inductive reasoning: there are gay people > there are gay footballers > sometimes some football fans are c**** and sing offensive songs = gay footballers are scared of coming out because the culture of football will see them go the way of Justin Fashanu.

 

Once again the press are presenting football as having a 'responsibility' to break down social barriers that have nothing to do with the sport.

 

Not sure what the general stats on this are but footballers are no different to everybody else, there are (I'm guessing) 2500 pro's, you reckon just a 'handful' are gay?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going on what the PFA said mostly but I have an open mind.

 

I'm willing to be contradicted but I'd be surprised if there are as many gay men working in football as in some other professions.

 

Probably. But even so, a lot more than a 'handful'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure what the general stats on this are but footballers are no different to everybody else, there are (I'm guessing) 2500 pro's, you reckon just a 'handful' are gay?

 

aye, the fact that the PFA have had discussions with 7 or 8, suggests there's many more I'd have thought ? You'd think it's one of the hardest environments to 'come out' in, in any shape or form, given the masculine nature of it, so there's likely many more who wouldn't feel comfortable talking to such fools as Clark Carlisle or Gordon Taylor. Or not, who knows I guess. it would be nice if it wasn't even a talking point really, but given the sport's appeal to the tabloid nation, it always will be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like he's more concerned about the reaction of people in his life than football fans.

If that's his concern why would he quit football?

 

I don't know too many people in the entertainment business (or any industry in fact other than professional men's sport) that feel they can't come out until their career is over.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that's his concern why would he quit football?

 

I don't know too many people in the entertainment business (or any industry in fact other than professional men's sport) that feel they can't come out until their career is over.

 

His career is not going well, he's got no club at 25, having last been on loan down the leagues, so who knows, but he makes no real reference to feeling forced out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

His career is not going well, he's got no club at 25, having last been on loan down the leagues, so who knows, but he makes no real reference to feeling forced out

"Now is my time to step away. It's time to discover myself away from football.''

 

Yes, he wasn't forced out. That's because he was in the closet, so to speak, so there was no reason for anyone to force him out. He has preempted that possibility by retiring.

 

You make it sound as if it's a coincidence that he is quitting football and coming out at the same time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Now is my time to step away. It's time to discover myself away from football.''

 

Yes, he wasn't forced out. That's because he was in the closet, so to speak, so there was no reason for anyone to force him out. He has preempted that possibility by retiring.

 

You make it sound as if it's a coincidence that he is quitting football and coming out at the same time.

 

Haven't. But I read what he wrote at reasonalbe length about his struggles with coming to terms with who he was and revealing his true self to family and friends, you bring up an allusion like that as evidence he is running from football's culture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't. But I read what he wrote at reasonalbe length about his struggles with coming to terms with who he was and revealing his true self to family and friends, you bring up an allusion like that as evidence he is running from football's culture.

Haven't read his blog so I'll take your word for it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't read his blog so I'll take your word for it

 

Seriously, why would you comment like you have without having read his blog post? You're just making the same lazy assumptions that some media seem to be making (which is why I'm posting in this thread).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seriously, why would you comment like you have without having read his blog post? You're just making the same lazy assumptions that some media seem to be making (which is why I'm posting in this thread).

Exactly how much of his blog post am I supposed to read before I can comment on the news story?

 

* Comments such as "If that's his concern why would he quit football?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...