Jump to content
By fans, for fans. By fans, for fans. By fans, for fans.

IT Industry


Jay Blizzay

Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

 

I was thinking of trying to get some professional qualifications to increase my employability.

Are there any recommended books for CCNA/CCNP? Any good online resources?

 

Has anyone here done any of these?

 

I don’t mind paying for the books but if there is an online learning method with a simulator/practice exams etc I think that would be an easier way for me to learn...or a combination of the two? There is a Cisco lab at work I have full access to with routers, switches etc.

 

Are there any growing areas in the industry where there will be a demand for candidates with experience/qualifications. I’m trying hard to find an area to specialise in as a career but unsure where to go (as in, which area will give me the most long term benefit).

 

Are there any other general areas in IT Support experiencing a boom? Are there any other cheap/free courses I can do to bulk up my CV?

 

Your help/advice is appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't do it would be my advise..... after years of repeatedly having to take exams and keep your certs up you will long for a job where you only have to qualify once...........

 

Cisco is a good starting point... you will always need networks, even if companies start moving more and more into the cloud.

Expirence is the key and the breaker though. While certs help on the CV, its the expirence that people will look for

Edited by AE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a problem logging on this morning at a colleague's pc.

 

Evenutally, after about an hour, a bloke phoned up to tell me that he'd sent me an email telling me I could now log on.

 

Let's face it, it's a racket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see why he would call having emailed you.

 

Where are you starting from? Determine the technology you want to work with then go from there, consider some of the IT management stuff CISSP CISA ITIL because there's more money there. The vendor based certifications I think have outlived their usefulness. It was merely a way to demonstrate to HR and Management who generally had no clue about IT that you had some competence. These are largely FoS and can be bought from brain dump sites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd look less at certs and look at specific technology. For example get comfortable with SharePoint of vm or cloud based offerings.

 

Latest trends are wireless, connecting anywhere and cloud or hosting services. They all encompass security. Become knowledgable in those areas and you'll be ok for Agee years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see why he would call having emailed you.

 

Where are you starting from? Determine the technology you want to work with then go from there, consider some of the IT management stuff CISSP CISA ITIL because there's more money there. The vendor based certifications I think have outlived their usefulness. It was merely a way to demonstrate to HR and Management who generally had no clue about IT that you had some competence. These are largely FoS and can be bought from brain dump sites.

 

Vendor certs are important to get your CV looked at. On their own they are fairly meaningless, but with expirence etc they make a good combination. They do also teach you how the products are meant to be implemented in the vendors eyes - and trust me there are a lot of "experts" that don't really understand the software they are using / implemening or supporting out there, hence you get a lot of **** deployments

 

Management is generally where the money is these days. If you are young I would always suggets doing a few years of techie first as it helps stop people like me pulling the wool over your eyes. I have met a great many IT managers who haven't a technical clue, but still get paid far more than I do......... the ones i have respected more are the ones who understand the technology. These people have tended to be the better managers, but it might be becuase there were better managers that they at least made the effort to understand what was going on.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vendor certs are important to get your CV looked at. On their own they are fairly meaningless, but with expirence etc they make a good combination. They do also teach you how the products are meant to be implemented in the vendors eyes - and trust me there are a lot of "experts" that don't really understand the software they are using / implemening or supporting out there, hence you get a lot of **** deployments

 

Management is generally where the money is these days. If you are young I would always suggets doing a few years of techie first as it helps stop people like me pulling the wool over your eyes. I have met a great many IT managers who haven't a technical clue, but still get paid far more than I do......... the ones i have respected more are the ones who understand the technology. These people have tended to be the better managers, but it might be becuase there were better managers that they at least made the effort to understand what was going on.........

 

I replaced a guy who had a MCSE about 12 years ago that couldn't map a network drive.

 

I work for a large software vendor and we don't really consider the vendor certs important any more, experience and having technical people in interviews along with technical testing is way more important.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I replaced a guy who had a MCSE about 12 years ago that couldn't map a network drive.

 

I work for a large software vendor and we don't really consider the vendor certs important any more, experience and having technical people in interviews along with technical testing is way more important.

 

Agree with the last bit. When we recruit we have techies like me talk to them as well.....

But how do you do your CV sorting to start with?? Agencies etc generally don't have a clue and anyone can b******it a CV. IMO expirence and certs help you get in the door. If the company are any good you will then get a drilling to find out how good you really are

Plus smaller and medium companies like the vendor certs as they help with the partnership levels etc with equals discounts, rebates support etc.

 

Cisco exams still mean something as well

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with the last bit. When we recruit we have techies like me talk to them as well.....

But how do you do your CV sorting to start with?? Agencies etc generally don't have a clue and anyone can b******it a CV. IMO expirence and certs help you get in the door. If the company are any good you will then get a drilling to find out how good you really are

Plus smaller and medium companies like the vendor certs as they help with the partnership levels etc with equals discounts, rebates support etc.

 

Cisco exams still mean something as well

 

I'd rather filter CV's by experience than by Vendor certification.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think certifications are great for people applying to junior positions. A lot of positions I've seen only need candidates to have at least a bachelors degree in C.S., software engineering or Telecommunications and good conceptual knowledge of the basics of whatever. Having a cert along with a college degree can get you an in person interview based on the idea that you should have your concepts covered because you managed to pass the certification exam. So, even though certifications never equate to a guarantee that you'd find a job, they increase your chances of getting an interview.

 

Certs also allow you to apply for jobs in a slightly different field. I'm a software engineer with little or no networking background. Its going to take a hell of a cover letter to convince employers to even consider me for an entry level system admin position (for example). But, if I get a Red Hat Linux System Administration or an MS Sharepoint certificate, it'll give me a helluva better chance to at least be called up for an initial phone convo.

 

I'm based off off D.C. and consulting to the government is big business here. And companies ask for a higher billing rate for potential contractors/sub-contractors who have the extra certificates to go with their resume. That sometimes attracts employers to candidates with certificates but I think thats just for the DMV region in the US. Of course, PMP's and CISSP's are different to SCJP's and CCNA's which (a) need a company to sponsor your certification (b) need applications to have relevant experience before applying but can get you a massive raise after you're done with these.

 

Jay, I've had roommates who appeared for the CCNA's last year. I'll ask one of them. I remember hearing the Todd Lammle and 'Nuggets' along with practice dumps which have forums dedicated to them.

Edited by carrafan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks carrafan.

 

i believe you're referring to CBT Nuggets which is meant to be a brilliant way to learn.

 

It is expensive though unless someone has links to torrents :P

 

 

Thats the one !! They swear by it.

 

I'm sure they get 'em via torrents. ;) Look up kat.ph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i believe you're referring to CBT Nuggets which is meant to be a brilliant way to learn.

 

Found out that you should be looking for video tutorials by Jeremy Cioara in whatever version of CBT Nuggets that you download. *ahem, buy*

Edited by carrafan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i think IT should be divided into two groups: those who do stuff and those who write presentations/project plans telling them what to do and when - with the latter group paid 30% more obviously

 

To be in the first group get certifications, to be in the second group avoid them like the plague

 

I work in SAP and the two big growth areas over the next few years are expected to be mobile (who'daguessed) and what they call HANA (high-speed analytics). Big money to be made in those. Our HANA guys get charged out at about a grand a day.

 

what do they get themselves? 250?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hehe - good question - probably not far off that but I suspect that is a little bit low end - I would think 250-350 depending on a number of factors...

 

It shows how mental it was in 2005 that I was being charged out for more than that then when I was in Germany. Good job considering I paid 150 for Mumm in Istanbul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see why he would call having emailed you.

 

Because he's a moron and probably realised (eventually) that the fact I couldn't log meant I couldn't see an email telling me that I could now log on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My best mate/best man owns this company http://www.tomorrowcomms.com/index.jsp (actually sold out to CACI but still running it). He's coming up to see me for a night next week. If you've got any specific industry questions I'll run then by him, Jay.

 

 

Should have said, we're actually going out around town for the evening if any regulars want to have a pint with him. I used to work with him for Kleinwort Benson before he started that company and he is, without doubt, one of the very best Networking guys in the industry and a heck of a top bloke too.

 

If you bump into two half cut guys, chatting women up by pretending to be Fathers Maguire and Jackson in town for a Priests Convention and one of them has a mad Gaelic accent that'll be us. He's some boy as well - used to be captain of Londons Gaelic Football team and pretty sure he won Irish Sports Personality of the year once or twice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...