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badtodabone

what book are you reading at the moment

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About to get cracking on Keith Richards' Life. Looking forward to this.

 

It also means I'm in danger of reading all the books I got for Xmas before Easter. Which is a first

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Right ho, Jeeves

 

One of the greatest books ever committed to print - fact. Practically perfect.

 

"Ah, in the post orange juice era!" is just brilliant.

 

Reading Palo Alto by James Franco, it's very good. The lad is quite the polymath.

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Just started (and finished because it's only 100 pages long) reading The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway. Brilliant from start to finish. First Hemingway i've read, but it definately won't be the last.

 

I really enjoyed 'Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises', but whenever I've spoken to anyone about him it's always been 'The Old Man and the Sea' and 'For Whom The Bell Tolls', which are both admittedly absolutely stunning to be fair, that gets all the kudos.

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Abu Hamid al-Ghazali on The Ninety Nine Beautiful Names Of God

 

The life of Muhammad (pbuh) - Tahia al-Ismail

 

Still need to finish Moby Dick too. Put it to one side when hodgson got the sack.

Finally got round to some of Ghazali's works... just started on one book from the series of Ihya Ulum al-Din, The ways to Perdition (Rub' al-'muhlikat). So far so good....

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haha is right, f*** off Roy!

 

I haven't read anything since Invisible by Paul Auster the other month.

Much like smithdown's mate in the cast thread, I've pretty much decided that Auster will do for me.

Other authors are sound and everything, but he's doing pretty much everything I need, so I'll just stick to Auster.

 

Haha! Yep. Auster. I mean, what more can you ask for really? He's cracking on.

 

Currently reading through 'Shampoo Planet' by Douglas Coupland. Read most of his stuff and I still can't decide whether I like him or hate him.

 

Half-way through 'The Ball Is Round' by David Goldblatt, which is a very interesting read but I've fallen off the wagon with of late. Same can be said of 'Coming From Behind' by Howard Jacobson.

 

Going to be ordering 'Good As Gold' by Joseph Heller later, think it's about time I read it seeing as my favourite book is 'Something Happened'.

 

In regards to Kate Atkinson, there's a copy of 'Case Histories' floating around at work, should I read it?

 

Definitely, definitely read Case Histories. It is rather wonderful.

 

Jo Nesbo's The Snowman. Quite enjoying it at the moment, though the time shifting is a little confusing sometimes.

 

Jo NESbo. Nesssssssssssssssbo! Jojojo Nesbo. Nesbo? Jo? f*** yeah, Jo Nesbo.

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Finally got around to reading Le Carre's Call For The Dead - what a debut novel! Short, punchy, tense, gripping - one of the most exhilerating books I've read in ages. Already gone out and bought his next two (including The Spy Who Came In From The Cold).

 

Love the fact he told Man Booker to piss off as well

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Finally got around to reading Le Carre's Call For The Dead - what a debut novel! Short, punchy, tense, gripping - one of the most exhilerating books I've read in ages. Already gone out and bought his next two (including The Spy Who Came In From The Cold).

 

they get even better

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Really enjoying 'Unbroken' by Laura Hillenbrand. A very powerful - and at times - harrowing story about an American runner who ran at the 1936 Olympics at Berlin, was drafted into the airforce and crashed into a rmote part of the Pacific and was eventually found and made a POW by the Japanese. The will to survive and the brutality are strong features at time but the individual's story from child to current day which bookend the war is remarkable. Recommended.

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just started with the jo nesbo lot and seems pretty good so far. doesn't grab you like the stieg larsson ones did but still not bad.

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just started with the jo nesbo lot and seems pretty good so far. doesn't grab you like the stieg larsson ones did but still not bad.

Just getting to the end of The Snowman - I think to compare these to Steig Larsson is a little harsh (and something I was guilty of), these are very much detective thrillers, whereas the Steig Larsson books, with Millennium as the common thread, are something a little different.

 

That said, much less fat in the Jo Nesbo books.

 

Jo NESbo. Nesssssssssssssssbo! Jojojo Nesbo. Nesbo? Jo? f*** yeah, Jo Nesbo.

I saw you twittering your love for her a while ago.

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Just finished (this morning whilst having a mini-lie-in) Psmith In The City by P.G.Wodehouse.

 

Feckn brilliant. It reads like an immature work but I think Psmith is my favourite Wodehouse character and there are some laugh out loud one-liners and set pieces in there. Loved it.

 

 

Trying to weigh up whether to start on a new bok altogether or try and finish one of the half dozen I'm currently part way through which are:

 

Tom Fort - The Book Of Eels

Adam Thorpe - Ulverton

D.H.Lawrence - Sons And Lovers

Irene Nemirovsky - Suite Francaise

Selina Hastings - The Private LIves of Somerset Maugham

Richard Holmes - The Age Of Wonders

 

 

And the contenders for the new start are:

 

Andrew Sandoval - The Monkees, The Day By Day Story

Wlifred Thesiger - Arabian Sands

Joseph Conrad - er.... recently been buying all his stuff in hardback and not sure which one to start on next but he's in the mix

David Niven - The Moon's A Balloon

Lawrence Durrell - Justine

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Just getting to the end of The Snowman - I think to compare these to Steig Larsson is a little harsh (and something I was guilty of), these are very much detective thrillers, whereas the Steig Larsson books, with Millennium as the common thread, are something a little different.

 

That said, much less fat in the Jo Nesbo books.

 

 

I saw you twittering your love for her a while ago.

 

yes she's quiet the looker isn't she? you helmet.

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:lol:

 

Not for a minute did I think that she was a he. So what's Knox's obsession about then?

think he just likes singing the name out loud.

Edited by Stevie H

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:lol:

 

Not for a minute did I think that she was a he. So what's Knox's obsession about then?

 

 

Don't look into Knox's mind. You'll explode.

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Just finished Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes, the best book I've read on the Vietnam War.

This is a gem - Atlas of Remote Islands: Fifty Islands I Have Not Visited and Never Will by Judith Schalansky.

Next up is Jerusalem by Simon Sebag Montefiore

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Finished Alex Higgins book a few days back - was alright, what a nutter he seemed to be.

 

Reading Johnny Cash's book now!

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Recently started reading the James Bond novels from the beginning. Just into 'Goldfinger'. Very much of a time regarding gender and race politics but what is really striking is Fleming's approach to each novel (so far) to present it almost as a travelogue - the description of the transportation used, the minute detail of the meals and drinks, the hotels and landscape. Sets the scenes for the narrative perfectly.

 

Bond's frailties and questioning of himself and his role come through strongly too.

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I'm reading Moneyball to see what all the fuss is about, and try to gain a bit of understanding on the ways in which our new owners will be working.

 

I started it ages ago, but then got into the Odd Thomas books by Dean Koontz and have ended up reading all four of them before returning to the non fiction. I really liked the Odd Thomas series, think Odd himself is a really good character quite unlike most heroes.

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David Niven - The Moon's A Balloon

 

 

 

This...

 

...will take an old well worn copy on holiday this summer to re-read now!

 

just started with the jo nesbo lot and seems pretty good so far. doesn't grab you like the stieg larsson ones did but still not bad.

 

 

They are totally different styles

 

 

Character has a cup of coffee in one book, and in the other.....

 

....Character has a cup of coffee in brand name store, describe where table is, expand on the cup material, further information over the country of origin of the coffee bean, description of the milk, finished off with a detailed explanation of the brand of credit card used to pay for it...

 

;)

Edited by Senrab_nhoj

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