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Listen to Liverpool's first supporters song & a revamped website!


Skeever

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Hello all

 

We on LFCHistory.net just relaunched our website last week with a brand new look and we have more or less re-programmed the whole website from the scratch. So please take a look and give us some feedback :-)

 

Also we came across this wonderful song in a 1907 edition of Liverpool Echo. "Hurrah for the Reds" was composed by W Seddon on 31st August 1907. Paul Wilkes is a singer/songwriter from Liverpool who so graciously agreed to record for us the first known supporters song for Liverpool.

You can find the song and the songsheet for the song right here.

http://www.lfchistory.net/Articles/Article/3145

 

Enjoy :-)

 

LFCHistory.net

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I wasn't trying to be pendant, I was expanding on your point a little. the natives of Liverpool were a very different breed at that time.

Ah sorry, I thought you were on about the usage of 'Scouser'. I had to look at it on the Online Etymology Dictionary and it's only attested as a term for Liverpudlians from 1945, which surprised me.

 

I think many of the football songs from anywhere England (particularly any that were published in a paper) would sound equally as genteel nowadays, to be fair.

 

Are you talking in terms of demographics or what's commonly understood to be the character of the place, then? Did I read a discussion on here about the Merseyside identity only breaking away from the general Lancashire one very recently (20th century)? (Or was it about the Liverpool accent, maybe? :unsure: )

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Apparently the accent had definitely broken away from Lancashire by the start of the 20th century.

This is a quote from a book i've got about this, from the Liverpool Evening Express on the 10th May 1922, "Liverpool is everything BUT Lancastrian. The Liverpool twang must remain outside the pale. It is distinctive, indescribable

and absolutely un-Lancashire. Liverpool is altogether too cosmopolitan."

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Scousers were quite posh in the olden days. Or had the working classes even hijacked association football by 1907? When did it stop being the gentleman's game?

 

I adore LFCHistory.net, by the way, Skeever. Keep it up :applause:

 

 

 

Thanks :-)

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