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Trans-Atlantic Accents


New York Red

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I'll b the first one to admit that my accent is totally f*cked up. But I was wondering something and maybe someone know the answer to this who is fluent in these languages.

 

Just as an American accent is to a British accent, is an Argentinian accent more sloppy than a Spanish accent? Is there a definite lack of form to it? Or to that of a Colombian, Mexican etc accent?

 

How about French Canadian and French? I've a bit of experience in this and found that French Canadian uses words that are no longer in use in France, and also that they seem to slur their words more.

 

What abour Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese?

 

As an aside, how does Dutch compare to Afrikaans and can they each get by in one anothers language?

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I'll b the first one to admit that my accent is totally f*cked up. But I was wondering something and maybe someone know the answer to this who is fluent in these languages.

 

Just as an American accent is to a British accent, is an Argentinian accent more sloppy than a Spanish accent? Is there a definite lack of form to it? Or to that of a Colombian, Mexican etc accent?

 

How about French Canadian and French? I've a bit of experience in this and found that French Canadian uses words that are no longer in use in France, and also that they seem to slur their words more.

 

What abour Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese?

 

As an aside, how does Dutch compare to Afrikaans and can they each get by in one anothers language?

 

On the last one - Afrikaans was once known as Kitchen Dutch. Its a bit of a b*****dised version of Dutch with some German and lots of Flemmish thrown in. I can understand Dutch people if they speak slowly and probably vice-versa, but it's nowhere near as close as Quebecois and French.

 

As a further aside, as I am back in New York again next week, can you tell me when the New York accent stops sounding so bloody awful?

Edited by DanielS
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South American spanish is the older version, closer to what the conquistadores spoke. Was travelling with a couple of spanish lads and in some situations I could understand Argentineans speaking Spanish better than them.

 

There's a definite difference between portugese and brazilian portugese. Can't put my finger on it though, probably more to do with accent/inflection and slang than anything else. To me, Obrigado sounds like "Obrigadoo" in Lisbon but "Obrigad" in Rio for example

Edited by Captain Sanil Crastow
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On the last one - Afrikaans was once known as Kitchen Dutch. Its a bit of a b*****dised version of Dutch with some German and lots of Flemmish thrown in. I can understand Dutch people if they speak slowly and probably vice-versa, but it's nowhere near as close as Quebecois and French.

 

As a further aside, as I am back in New York again next week, can you tell me when the New York accent stops sounding so bloody awful?

 

Which one?

 

The Washington Heights hispanic accent?

 

The Brooklyn Italian accent?

 

The Brownsville hood accent?

 

The South Bronx PR accent?

 

The East Side plum in the mouth accent?

 

Just chill dude...

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The Quebecois and the French can understand one another they just pretend not to.

 

For political reasons the Quebecois resist any anglicized words, therefore in Quebec they create new words which don't exist in other French speaking countries. ie courriel instead of le email or la fin du semaine instead le weekend.

 

The other one I've been told but can offer no authoritative views is the accent in Newfoundland, particularly in the outports on the south coast is supposed to be the way Irish was spoken 300 years ago. Would be interested if anyone knows more about this.

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South American spanish is the older version, closer to what the conquistadores spoke. Was travelling with a couple of spanish lads and in some situations I could understand Argentineans speaking Spanish better than them.

 

There's a definite difference between portugese and brazilian portugese. Can't put my finger on it though, probably more to do with accent/inflection and slang than anything else. To me, Obrigado sounds like "Obrigadoo" in Lisbon but "Obrigad" in Rio for example

 

Very interesting. The reverse of what happened with America/Britain.

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Heard from someone who speaks the language that the South American Spanish is more similar to Portuguese than actual spanish and that its easier to pick up what the portuguese are saying than the spaniards for a south american.

 

Which one?

 

The Washington Heights hispanic accent?

 

The Brooklyn Italian accent?

 

The Brownsville hood accent?

 

The South Bronx PR accent?

 

The East Side plum in the mouth accent?

 

Just chill dude...

 

 

Haha, you do realise that there is no general spanish accent. Catalan, Madrid Based, the way the Basque speak spanish are all different as well.

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My Dad got a right bolloking off his sister in Holland when he spoke to a shop keeper in Afrikans and not proper Dutch. The shopper keeper didn't look that happy either but he served my Dad, who was made to apologize by his sister.

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Should clarify that I could understand what the Argentineans were saying better than the Spanish lads could.

 

Not sure what you mean there about America/Britain.

 

American English is very corrupted and sloppy. It sounds like Argentinian Spanish is more proper and regimented than it is in Spain.

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My Dad got a right bolloking off his sister in Holland when he spoke to a shop keeper in Afrikans and not proper Dutch. The shopper keeper didn't look that happy either but he served my Dad, who was made to apologize by his sister.

 

The Dutch are funny about Afrikaans. Almost like the Austrians about Hitler.

 

Godwin!

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Heard from someone who speaks the language that the South American Spanish is more similar to Portuguese than actual spanish and that its easier to pick up what the portuguese are saying than the spaniards for a south american.

 

 

 

 

Haha, you do realise that there is no general spanish accent. Catalan, Madrid Based, the way the Basque speak spanish are all different as well.

 

Yep. I was aware of that. No different to any country. I was just referring to the general manner in which the whole country spoke.

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American English is very corrupted and sloppy. It sounds like Argentinian Spanish is more proper and regimented than it is in Spain.

It's often said 'American English' is closer - at least in accent - to the way English was spoken in Shakespeares time than the 'Queen's English' today. Not sure which American accent was being referred to, or how they could know.

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It's often said 'American English' is closer - at least in accent - to the way English was spoken in Shakespeares time than the 'Queen's English' today. Not sure which American accent was being referred to, or how they could know.

 

That's interesting. Never heard that before.

 

There are some isolated communities on islands in Chesapeake Bay where they have a distinct western England accent. American Wurzels if you like.

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American English is very corrupted and sloppy. It sounds like Argentinian Spanish is more proper and regimented than it is in Spain.

 

Not sure that's true - a lot of the standard Americanisms in English are remnants of old English carried over in centuries gone by. And there's some appallingly sloppy English in the UK.

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Should clarify that I could understand what the Argentineans were saying better than the Spanish lads

 

When I was in Peru, I was told that the Spanish language in Argentina is very different from Spanish proper and people from Peru and Bolivia can struggle to understand it too. Apparently in Peru and Bolivia (also Chile but with a stronger accent) the Spanish they speak is closer to the Spanish of Spain,although there are still clear differences, such as they pronounce the "C" the same as we do in English in words like celery as opposed to the Spanish lisp.

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