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Feelgoods film


Des

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If you've got a spare two hours and you haven't already seen it, then I thoroughly recommend watching this film about the fantastic Dr Feelgood. Yes, it's a Julien Temple thing and he's a bellend, but the subject matter overrides any of that (even if some of the film inserts get on yer t1ts after a while). Far, far better than The Filth and The Fury which I personally thought was gash.

 

Oh and Wilko Johnson is a f*cking hero.

 

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I missed this when it was in theatres, couldn't make the Sound City screening and was hoping it would turn up on DVD soon; I didn't realise it had already been on telly until Kermode mentioned it a couple of weeks ago, and was pig sick I hadn't caught it - so tonight is definitely one for the Sky+. (Thanks, Des)

 

* Saw them 3 times - 2 @ the Stadium with Wilko, 1 @ the Empire (iirc) without. Fantastic live. I like to think the crowd performance at the Stadium gigs went a long way to demolishing the old 'Graveyard of Champions', because when they encored with 'Riot in Cell Block No. 9' the place got absolutely trashed - seats smashed, people on stage, bottles, fighting etc. but Wilko jagging about madly between the chaos all around him and the hardest and coolest man in the place stock still in the middle of the stage with a harmonica in his fist - Lee Brilleaux, RIP.

Edited by JRC
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We were deprived of good bands in the 70's in the Isle of Man (think glam rock tripe, and Status Bleeding Quo), but when the Feelgoods showed up (with Wilko) it was heaven. Saw them twice. Superb.

 

My missus keeps dragging me to see them now (no original members = what's the f*cking point?) and they're like some arl pub band. Well, that's because they are some arl pub band.

 

Saw Wilko's band a few years back at the Worthing Assembly but its not the same.

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You lucky man. I'm probably more jealous of people who saw this group with Wilko than any other bands I was too young to appreciate at the time.

 

 

Nobody compares Des. His party piece, 'Look into the sky, sky's full of aeroplanes' then gunned them down with his guitar.

 

We were deprived of good bands in the 70's in the Isle of Man (think glam rock tripe, and Status Bleeding Quo), but when the Feelgoods showed up (with Wilko) it was heaven. Saw them twice. Superb.

 

My missus keeps dragging me to see them now (no original members = what's the f*cking point?) and they're like some arl pub band. Well, that's because they are some arl pub band.

 

Saw Wilko's band a few years back at the Worthing Assembly but its not the same.

 

 

Saw Brilleaux in the early 90's with a gang of kids as Dr. Feelgood with Micky Jupp Band backing them, they had The Big Figure on drums and john Sparks on bass, 'twas mates jamming and having fun at The Town and Country Club and nothing more. RIP Lee.

Edited by Murphman
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You lucky man. I'm probably more jealous of people who saw this group with Wilko than any other bands I was too young to appreciate at the time.

They were great Des - Wilko was terrific on stage. Saw them at the Hope and Anchor several times (once with the Motors - remember them?) just before they began to get famous. Great, great live band.

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Saw them a couple of times also and they were great. Wilko is a unique stage presence. I always thought it was the result of taking industrial quantities of speed but having seen the documentary I'm not so sure. The crazed intensity looks to be a large part of who he is.

 

Then again it could long term amphetamine psychosis...

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Saw them a couple of times also and they were great. Wilko is a unique stage presence. I always thought it was the result of taking industrial quantities of speed but having seen the documentary I'm not so sure. The crazed intensity looks to be a large part of who he is.

 

Then again it could long term amphetamine psychosis...

Nah don't think so. Heard lots of accounts over the years that at first the 'act' was to cover up or distract from an initial poor technique (he doesn't use a plec and as a result in the early days found bar chords hard to intonate) ' mak schau', if you will. But it was in the end both popular and a Wilko trademark along with his more developed, choppy finger-strumming style.

 

So it's probably the speed then ;)

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They were great Des - Wilko was terrific on stage. Saw them at the Hope and Anchor several times (once with the Motors - remember them?) just before they began to get famous. Great, great live band.

 

Dr Feelgood had a number one album in 1976, a year before the Motors formed, so they were quite famous at least one of the times you saw them.

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Dr Feelgood had a number one album in 1976, a year before the Motors formed, so they were quite famous at least one of the times you saw them.

 

 

Stupidity came out in 1976 and in 1975 an ad carrying a photo of Brilleaux's white tux all battered grubby and worn was all over the NME with 'this jacket will be appearing at The Hammersmith Odeon in July'. They broke in 1974 (ish) as I recall.

Edited by Murphman
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How come the Feelgoods are getting the kind of acclaim they are now? Is it purely down to the documentary because my memory of them was that for a large part of the 80s/90s they were seen as a step from something good to something great during an era largely dominated by pretentious s****. Better for what they were not in many ways.

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How come the Feelgoods are getting the kind of acclaim they are now? Is it purely down to the documentary because my memory of them was that for a large part of the 80s/90s they were seen as a step from something good to something great during an era largely dominated by pretentious s****. Better for what they were not in many ways.

 

 

It wasn't like that at the time, punk was coming through and 'pretentious sh*t' couldn't be a worse description of punk, it was back to basics. And so were The Feelgood's, they kept it simple, raw R&B, Brilleuax's voice was amazing, Wiko's duck walk and stage act hilariously brilliant, they were the consumate live act, EVERYBODY got pissed off their face before a Feelgood's concert, it was party time without the dodgy haircuts bin liners and drawing pins. They didn't last long, their music had a shelf life I suppose but for 4 or 5 years they were glorious, easily the most fun i ever had at a concert.

Edited by Murphman
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I can only remember them because they were one of the many acts on Top of the Pops who could make my whole family crease up in laughter. It really was high comedy from the mid 70s on what with Sparks, most punk groups and then the new romantics. Great days.

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They were clearly a 'gateway' group in that they showed the potential for an alternative kind of music to the prevalent 'pretentious sh*te' - loud, fantastic live, high energy, short songs - without being bound by the blokishness of the worst of 'pub rock'. See also Eddie and the Hot Rods, Kilburn and the High Roads - and The Motors, tbf (as well as the US versions - the Ramones, of course, but also The Flaming Groovies) - that presaged the full-on cultural blitzkrieg that was Punk.

 

Of course in a classic psychological shift, many punk bands vehemently rejected Feelgood as their precursors in favour of the more on-message NY Dolls, Iggy, Reggae, Bowie (sometimes) etc, but for many of us it was they who opened our eyes to the bloated hollowness of the likes of Yes, ELP etc - because they made fantastic records and were utterly awesome live, not just as John The Baptist to the Pistols.

 

The documentary is a long-needed record and reminder of their greatness before all us arl arses fade away.

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Dr Feelgood had a number one album in 1976, a year before the Motors formed, so they were quite famous at least one of the times you saw them.

Feelgood were on the cusp when I first saw them - 'Famous' in London, but not so much elsewhere in the country - as Murph says, they were being 'bigged up' in the NME even before they had a recording contract, and at this time were the 'First Family' of what became known as 'Pub Rock' - the Motors were their contemporaries and possibly one or two having been session men, a little older (I think they went back to being session men later on).

 

Not 'alf, pop pickers.

:lol:

He did go a bit 'Andy Kershaw' there...

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Feelgood were on the cusp when I first saw them - 'Famous' in London, but not so much elsewhere in the country - as Murph says, they were being 'bigged up' in the NME even before they had a recording contract, and at this time were the 'First Family' of what became known as 'Pub Rock' - the Motors were their contemporaries and possibly one or two having been session men, a little older (I think they went back to being session men later on).

 

Wilko Johnson had left the band by the time the Motors formed. Feelgood were well known all over the country by 1975. Here's a clip of them on a TV show filmed in Newcastle that year...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eVyofFm0Rw

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